'This is mad': Tennis world stunned by 'appalling' Wimbledon fail

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·Sports Reporter
·4-min read
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Karen Khachanov (pictured right) and Sebastian Korda (pictured left) were involved in one of the most bizarre fifth sets ever seen in tennis during their Wimbledon clash. (Getty Images)
Karen Khachanov (pictured right) and Sebastian Korda (pictured left) were involved in one of the most bizarre fifth sets ever seen in tennis during their Wimbledon clash. (Getty Images)

The match between Karen Khachanov and Sebastian Korda left the tennis world in utter disbelief after a record number of service breaks in the fifth set sparked a rollercoaster of emotions at Wimbledon.

Khachanov was leading 2-1 in sets when the young 21-year-old American broke back to send himself to the first five set match of his career.

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While Korda would have been way too young to have watched the tennis great Boris Becker win three Wimbledon titles, he may have heard his famous quote: "The fifth set isn't about tennis, it's all about nerves."

And the American was quick to understand what Becker was on about after both Korda and Khachanov broke serve 13 times in a record haul.

Both exhausted after hours on court, the pair's nerves got to them as the tennis world watch on in disbelief as break after break ensued.

The final set went for more than an hour and finished 10-8 to Khachanov who held his 'nerves' for one game and clinch the decider.

The match between Khachanov and Korda may have been a thriller, and a must watch after the drama, but both gained an unwanted slice of history - or wanted if you spin it - after smashing the record for most break's in a men's singles set.

IBM data had the record at nine breaks back in 1997.

Tennis fans were left gobsmacked at the scenes and were left stunned after the three hour and 49 minute classic.

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Khachanov and Korda enter Wimbledon history

In complete contrast to the famous Wimbledon match between Nicolas Mahut and John Isner.

The longest match in tennis history saw the pair hold serve in the fifth set until Isner broke Mahut and held again to win the fifth at Wimbledon 70-68.

Karen Khanchanov (pictured right) greets Sebastian Korda (pictured left) and shakes hands after victory at Wimbledon.
Karen Khanchanov (pictured right) shakes hands with Sebastian Korda (pictured left) after victory at Wimbledon. (Photo by Peter Nicholls/PA Images via Getty Images)

While his first fifth set of his career didn't go to plan, Korda showed he is the rising star of US men's tennis.

The youngster is the son of two former professional tennis players and a unique sporting family.

His father Petr Korda who accompanied him to Wimbledon won the Australian Open in 1998.

He credits his mother - also a former pro star - Regina Rajchrtova with teaching him to be calm on cour.

And he is brother of two current stars in women's golf Jessica and Nelly, the latter who is ranked World No.1 and just won her first major.

Karen Khachanov (pictured) falls down as he celebrates his win over Sebastian Korda at Wimbledon.
Karen Khachanov (pictured) celebrates in his Men's Singles Fourth Round match against Sebastian Korda at Wimbledon. (Photo by Peter Nicholls - Pool/Getty Images)

He became the youngest man to reach the Round of 16 at the All England Club since Andy Roddick in 2003.

Khachanov will have to recover as he faces in-form Canadian Denis Shapavolov in the quarter-finals.

with AAP

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