'Truly awful': Tennis fans gutted over 'horrible' Wimbledon drama

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Aja Tomljanovic, pictured here advancing to the quarter-finals when Emma Raducanu was forced to retire.
Aja Tomljanovic advanced to the quarter-finals when Emma Raducanu was forced to retire. Image: Getty

Ajla Tomljanovic has progressed to her first grand slam quarter-final at Wimbledon after British teen sensation Emma Raducanu was forced to retire in the second set.

Raducanu was trailing 4-6 0-3 against the Aussie star when she called a medical timeout and left the court.

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But in heartbreaking scenes just minutes later, tournament officials came out on court to inform Tomljanovic that Raducanu could not continue.

The 18-year-old had been treated for a problem with breathlessness that appeared to have cropped up at the start of the second set.

Emma Raducanu, pictured here receiving medical treatment before deciding to retire hurt.
Emma Raducanu received medical treatment before deciding to retire hurt. (Photo by Mike Hewitt/Getty Images)

It ended a remarkable run for the 18-year-old, who captivated the UK with her incredible march into the fourth round.

"I am actually shocked because Emma must be hurt if she came to the decision to retire," Tomljanovic told the No.1 court crowd.

"I am really sorry for her, I wish we could have finished it. I am wishing her all the best.

"I thought I found my groove although Emma was hurt and not at her best, which kind of explains it."

Ranked 338th in the world, Raducanu received a wild-card invitation from the All England Club so she could make her grand slam debut and participate in only her second tour-level event.

And she certainly didn't let them down, becoming the youngest British player since 2002 to reach the third round.

Tennis fans were left gutted over the devastating scenes on Monday.

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Tomljanovic to face Ash Barty in Wimbledon quarters

It will now be an all-Aussie affair in the Wimbledon quarter-finals, with Tomljanovic taking on World No.1 Ash Barty for a place in the semis.

Barty had earlier moved into uncharted territory at Wimbledon, reaching the quarter-finals for the first time by ending the fairytale run of French Open champion Barbora Krejcikova.

Australia's top seed ended the Czech's 15-match unbeaten streak on the tournament's famous second week 'Manic Monday', winning 7-5 6-3 with a performance that grew in authority during the match.

Barty found a way of unravelling the puzzle of the tricky Krejcikova, who hadn't lost a match while sailing to victory on the clay courts of Strasbourg and Roland Garros.

Barty began nervously, getting broken in just the third game, courtesy of a double fault and wayward errors off either wing.

Krejcikova, playing remarkably in her maiden Wimbledon main draw, looked perfectly comfortable on her own delivery, until a calamitous eighth game when she gifted Barty a double, a simple netted volley and a sorry backhand into the net.

Barty gradually started dictating, earning a set point at 5-4 which Krejickova repelled but making no mistake in the Czech's next service game, breaking her to love to take a set during which she'd never looked completely at home after 47 minutes.

After soaking up pressure in the second set, Barty struck like a cobra, playing a couple of dazzling points, including one lovely drop shot-lob combination, to make it 4-2.

Krejcikova bounced back again to break, helped by a Barty double, but when the Australian started knifing in the slice in the next game to break for the fourth time overall, she made no mistake when serving for the match, prevailing after one hour and 35 minutes.

"Being in the quarter, I'm happy, I'm excited," smiled Barty.

"It's another stepping stone for me, another first, I suppose. It's going to be a new scenario, one that I'm going to look forward to and enjoy no matter what.

"Certainly happy with the way things are going. It's a stepping stone to what is kind of one of my biggest dreams. We just keep chipping away..."

with AAP

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