Victor Radley's dressing room drama forces NRL players to act

·Contributor
·2-min read
Victory Radley is set for conversations with NRL officials after he was seen on camera simulating a sex act on Blues teammate Joseph Sualii. Picture: Channel Nine
Victory Radley is set for conversations with NRL officials after he was seen on camera simulating a sex act on Blues teammate Joseph Sualii. Picture: Channel Nine

NRL players are set to front their players' union to ask if there has been a change in the amount of dressing-room access host broadcasters are permitted on the back of the Victor Radley drama.

Radley is facing censure from the NRL after he was caught on camera in the NSW dressing sheds simulating a sex act on fellow Rooster and Blues squad member Joseph Suaalii following their team's big win in Origin II.

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NRL boss Andrew Abdo described the incident as "far from ideal", promising to haul Radley in for a chat.

But while stopping short of defending Radley's actions, players are becoming increasingly anxious about what is beamed into viewers' homes and will ask the Rugby League Players Association (RLPA) to address the situation with broadcasters at the end of the season.

They want clarification around broadcasters' access and obligations.

"Technically, it used to be that there were always time limits that the dressing room cameras were allowed to film," one veteran club official told Yahoo Sport Australia.

"It used to be a designated set period pre-game, at half-time and post-game. There definitely used to be a time limit.

"I am not sure if under the new broadcast deal that has now disappeared and it's now open slather, or it's still in place but the broadcasters are ignoring the restrictions, especially given that it's Origin where anything goes.

"It's definitely worth looking into."

Victor Radley, pictured here in action for the Roosters in the NRL.
Victor Radley in action for the Roosters in the NRL. (Photo by Albert Perez/Getty Images)

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But the official concedes there really is no excuse for a player misbehaving and its best practice to assume the camera is always on.

He said: "I wouldn’t say players are constantly warned but they all know, so there's no excuse really.

"There's no surprise element - it's part and parcel of the modern game. In fact, I regularly hear our players reminding each other in the change rooms about the cameras. They definitely know."

One high-profile member of a Sydney club's coaching staff added: "We can see a red indicator light (to indicate whether the camera is on and off) but we don’t trust it.

"We can also see it move. We know its positions.

"But it's up to the decency and common sense of the producers as to what is an invasion or suitable viewing."

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