Greg Norman reveals insane figure Tiger Woods rejected in LIV Golf snub

Greg Norman has confirmed that Tiger Woods turned down an offer in the region of $700-800 million to join LIV Golf. Pic: Getty/Fox News
Greg Norman has confirmed that Tiger Woods turned down an offer in the region of $700-800 million to join LIV Golf. Pic: Getty/Fox News

Greg Norman has shed more light on the eye-watering sums of money Tiger Woods turned down by not taking up an offer to join the Saudi-backed competition.

Norman is the CEO of LIV Golf - bankrolled by Saudi Arabia's Private Investment Fund - which has given the Aussie great a reported $3 billion war chest to try and lure some of the world's best golfers.

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Major winners such as Phil Mickelson, Brooks Koepka, Dustin Johnson and Henrik Stenson are among the high-profile recruits to the controversial series, which has been accused of "sportswashing" by using golf to help improve Saudi Arabia's tarnished reputation around human rights abuses.

Earlier this year, Norman claimed Woods turned down a "mind-blowingly enormous" deal to be LIV's biggest drawcard, before the American's great rival Phil Mickelson was eventually given the honour.

Mickelson reportedly agreed to a deal worth around $US200 million ($AUD278 million) to be the most high-profile golfer competing in the rebel series.

However, that figure pales in comparison to what Woods was offered, with Norman revealing in June that it was a sum in the "high nine digits".

Speaking in a Fox News interview that aired in the United States on Monday night, Norman was asked by Tucker Carlson whether it was true that LIV Golf offered Woods between $700 million and $800 million.

"That number has been out there, yes," Norman responded.

"Tiger is a needle mover. So of course you've got to look at the best of the best.

"They had originally approached Tiger before I became CEO," he said, "adding, "yes, that number is somewhere in that neighbourhood."

Norman was speaking at LIV Golf's third and final event for 2022 at former US President Donald Trump's course in Bedminster, New Jersey.

The tournament was overshadowed by protests from families of the victims of the 9/11 attacks on the World Trade Center, and the fact that 19 of the terrorists involved were Saudi nationals.

Trump himself came under fire for explosive comments to reporters before the tournament after claiming that “nobody’s gotten to the bottom” of the September 11 terrorist attacks during a controversial defence of the LIV Golf series.

Greg Norman defends LIV Golf amid global uproar

Norman's LIV Golf venture has also found itself under attack from the world's leading tours and many of the sport's best players.

Asked why his rival tour had caused such a stir for golf fans around the world, Norman admitted he was puzzled by the uproar.

“I don’t know. I really don’t care, quite honestly,” Norman said.

“I just love the game of golf so much and I just want to grow the game of golf. We at LIV see that opportunity not just for the men but for the women.

"We at LIV see it for NCAA and younger generations. We at LIV see it as a pathway to opportunities for these kids to experience a new world out there. LIV is the future of golf.”

Pictured right, LIV CEO Greg Norman speaks with former US President Donald Trump at the LIV golf invitational series event in New Jersey.
LIV CEO Greg Norman (R) speaks with former US President Donald Trump at the LIV golf invitational series event in Bedminster, New Jersey. Pic: Getty

The LIV Golf Series last week announced a 14-event schedule that will award $US405 million ($A575m) in prize money in 2023, prompting a telling response from the PGA Tour.

In an announcement about its own schedule for the 2022-23 season, the PGA Tour says total prize money will balloon to a record $US415 million ($A590m).

Further, the Tour will dole out an additional $US145 million ($A206m) in bonus money, including $US75 million ($A107m) for the FedExCup.

"We've heard from our fans and the overwhelming sentiment was that they wanted more consequences for both the FedEx Cup regular season and the playoffs, and to further strengthen events that traditionally feature top players competing head-to-head," PGA Tour commissioner Jay Monahan said in a statement.

"We feel strongly we've accomplished all of these objectives and more, creating a cadence of compelling drama for every tournament throughout the season."

with agencies

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