PGA Tour announces $590 million move to counter Greg Norman

LIV Golf CEO Greg Norman (pictured left) during a tournament and (pictured right) Rory McIlroy during The Open.
The PGA Tour has responded emphatically to the threat of LIV Golf - spearheaded by Greg Norman (pictured left) - after announcing a record $US415 million ($A590m) for the 2022-23 season. (Getty Images)

The PGA Tour has responded emphatically to the threat of LIV Golf after announcing a record $US415 million ($A590m) prize pool for the 2022-23 season.

LIV Golf, backed by Aussie Greg Norman, has sparked the biggest division in golf in recent history with top stars such as Phil Mickelson, Brooks Koepka and Bryson DeChambeau joining the Saudi-backed breakaway league.

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The latest blow for the PGA Tour was European Ryder Cup captain Henrik Stenson's controversial move to LIV Golf.

The sacked captain's defection paid immediate dividends after the Swede pocketed more than $AUD6 million in his very first tournament.

Prize money has been a big reason for many of the players defecting to LIV Golf and the PGA Tour has responded.

The PGA Tour will dole out an additional $US145 million ($A206m) in bonus money, including $US75 million ($A107m) for the FedExCup.

This comes after the announcement the renegade LIV Golf Series announced a 14-event schedule that will award $US405 million ($A575m) in prize money in 2023.

But, PGA Tour commissioner Jay Monahan claimed the governing body has listened to fans and responded.

"We've heard from our fans and the overwhelming sentiment was that they wanted more consequences for both the FedEx Cup regular season and the playoffs, and to further strengthen events that traditionally feature top players competing head-to-head," Monahan said in a statement.

"We feel strongly we've accomplished all of these objectives and more, creating a cadence of compelling drama for every tournament throughout the season."

PGA Tour Commissioner Jay Monahan (pictured) addresses the media during a press conference.
PGA Tour Commissioner Jay Monahan (pictured) announced prize money on the PGA Tour would increase for the 2022-23 season. (Photo by Michael Reaves/Getty Images)

Henrik Stenson's controversial move to LIV Golf

LIV Golf's latest win over the PGA Tour's was the announcement of the European Ryder Cup captain Stenson.

Stenson was immediately stripped off his captaincy title, but his first tournament at the LIV Golf Invitational at Trump National Golf Club in New Jersey paid dividends.

The Swede carded a final round of 69 at Bedminster to claim victory by two shots over Dustin Johnson and Matthew Wolff, and pocket the individual first prize of $US4million ($AUD5.7m).

The 46-year-old also earned $US375,000 US dollars ($AUD537,570) as part of the Majesticks team - along with Lee Westwood, Ian Poulter and Sam Horsfield - which finished second in the team competition.

Stenson's prize money at his first tournament in LIV Golf is stagger.

To put it in perspective, since turning pro in 1999, Stenson has only surpassed US$4 million mark just twice in his PGA Tour career in a single season.

BELIV Golf CEO Greg Norman (pictured left) and Henrik Stenson (pictured right) pose with the individual trophy after the final round of the LIV Golf Invitational at Trump National Golf Club.
BELIV Golf CEO Greg Norman (pictured left) and Henrik Stenson (pictured right) pose with the individual trophy after the final round of the LIV Golf Invitational at Trump National Golf Club. (Photo by Montana Pritchard/LIV Golf via Getty Images)

"I guess we can agree I played like a captain," Stenson joked in a post-round interview on LIV Golf's YouTube stream.

"It's been a good first week obviously. Nice to be here with the guys getting a feel for it. It's been a busy 10 days and I'm extremely proud I managed to finish as well as I did.

"Got a little wobbly at the end but that (par) putt on 17 was massive."

with AAP

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