'Stay safe': Cricket legend Sachin Tendulkar admitted to hospital

Chris Young
·Sports Reporter
·5-min read
Legendary batsman Sachin Tendulkar has been admitted to hospital after testing positive for the coronavirus last week. (Photo by Satish Bate/Hindustan Times via Getty Images)
Legendary batsman Sachin Tendulkar has been admitted to hospital after testing positive for the coronavirus last week. (Photo by Satish Bate/Hindustan Times via Getty Images)

Cricket great Sachin Tendulkar has revealed he has been hospitalised after testing positive for the coronavirus.

The legendary Indian batsman announced on Twitter that he was following medical advice to go to hospital, having been quarantining at home for several days prior.

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He lives in Mumbai, the capital of the Western Indian state of Maharashtra which has been the hardest hit by a resurgence in COVID-19 cases.

Tendulkar, 48, said he had shown only mild symptoms and expected to be back at home soon.

“As a matter of abundant precaution under medical advice, I have been hospitalised,” he wrote on Friday.

“I hope to be back home in a few days. Take care and stay safe everyone.”

The disquieting news did nothing to take Tendulkar's mind off cricket though, with the champion batsman also giving a shoutout to former teammates on the anniversary of India's 2011 Cricket World Cup triumph.

His announcement prompted an outpouring of support on social media, with cricket fans, as well as former teammates and rivals, hopeful Tendulkar would be able to make a swift recovery.

Tendulkar announced that he had tested positive for the coronavirus last week.

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The former Indian Test captain's record mark of 100 centuries remains far above that of any other player, following his retirement from cricket in 2013, bringing to an end one of the most remarkable careers the sport has seen.

Maharashtra had as many as 43,183 new cases on Friday with the country’s financial hub Mumbai reporting 8646 of them - both a record for single day infections.

Earlier in the day, India reported 81,466 new COVID-19 infections, the highest daily number in six months, as several states were hit by a second wave of the coronavirus.

Umpire's call upheld after ICC's DRS review

The International Cricket Council has announced that 'umpire's call' will remain part of the decision review system despite India captain Virat Kohli's recent criticisms.

Ahead of the one-day series between India and England last week, Kohli said umpire's call is "creating a lot of confusion" and suggested batsmen should be given out lbw if it was shown that any part of the ball was hitting the stumps.

While some tweaks have been made to its protocols, the ICC cricket committee - headed by former India captain and coach Anil Kumble - gave its backing to continue using umpire's call to the board, which has now ratified the decision.

The DRS system used in international cricket has undergone some minor changes after a review by the ICC. (Photo by Ryan Pierse/Getty Images)
The DRS system used in international cricket has undergone some minor changes after a review by the ICC. (Photo by Ryan Pierse/Getty Images)

Kumble said: "The Cricket Committee had an excellent discussion around umpire's call and analysed its use extensively.

"The principle underpinning DRS was to correct clear errors in the game whilst ensuring the role of the umpire as the decision-maker on the field of play was preserved, bearing in mind the element of prediction involved with the technology.

"Umpire's call allows that to happen, which is why it is important it remains."

The ICC did, however, confirm that the height and width margins will now align for umpire's call, with a review extending to the top of the bails.

A player will also be able to ask the on-field official whether a genuine attempt has been made to play the ball before deciding whether to review an lbw verdict.

The third umpire can also now check a replay of any short run that has been called and correct any mistake prior to the next ball being bowled.

Meanwhile, the interim regulations put in place to allow cricket to continue amid the COVID-19 pandemic last year, such as the implementation of home umpires, an extra DRS review in all formats and the banning of saliva to polish the ball, will continue to be applied.

With AAP

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