Nick Kyrgios spotted in eye-opening act amid Wimbledon celebrations

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Nick Kyrgios, pictured here wearing his red cap as he celebrated his Wimbledon heroics.
Nick Kyrgios was still wearing his red cap as he celebrated his Wimbledon heroics. Image: Instagram

Nick Kyrgios has celebrated his remarkable run to the Wimbledon final by hitting the town and partying with family and friends in London.

Kyrgios went down to Novak Djokovic in Sunday's final at the All England Club, succumbing to the 21-time grand slam champion despite winning the first set.

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On Sunday night, Kyrgios hit the Dolce nightclub in ritzy High St, Kensington, accompanied by girlfriend Costeen, sister Halimah and the rest of his entourage.

Costeen shared a number of photos and videos of the celebrations, showing Halimah flaunting expensive bottles of vodka and tequila.

In one video, Kyrgios could be seen wearing the same red cap he infamously wore during the trophy presentation after the Wimbledon final.

The mercurial Aussie defied Wimbledon's strict all-white dress code when he wore the red hat for the post-match ceremony, accepting his runner-up trophy from the Duchess of Cambridge while wearing it.

The red cap was a clear breach of Wimbledon's 145-year tradition of only wearing white, with Kyrgios appearing to flout the rules in one final act of defiance against officials.

Nick Kyrgios, pictured here breaking Wimbledon's dress code with his red cap in the trophy presentation.
Nick Kyrgios broke Wimbledon's dress code with his red cap in the trophy presentation. Image: Getty

He also wore the hat on court after his win over Brandon Nakashima in the fourth round, which prompted a spiteful back-and-forth with a reporter in his press conference.

Despite the clear rule breach, Kyrgios has seemingly escaped sanction for wearing the hat during the presentation.

He was hit with a $4000 fine for an audible obscenity during the final against Djokovic, but nothing has emerged about whether or not he was punished for the hat.

Nick Kyrgios departs Wimbledon with head held high

As much as he admitted it "sucks" to lose in the final, Kyrgios accepted the defeat with dignity, saying he gave it everything he had.

While shattered at an opportunity lost, Kyrgios hoped he could depart his beloved grass-court grand slam with head held high.

"I feel like I've committed a fair bit these two weeks," he said.

"What more can I do, to be honest? I've stayed in most of the time. I've tried to just get good sleep, eat well. Not even have a beer here or there.

"I've really tried to commit. My practices I've really tried to focus, tried to work on things.

"Like, I've committed. I've committed everything I can commit these two weeks and I just came up short. I was taught that's all right, even though it sucks. Of course it sucks."

Nick Kyrgios, pictured here in action against Novak Djokovic during the Wimbledon final.
Nick Kyrgios in action against Novak Djokovic during the Wimbledon final. (Photo by Visionhaus/Getty Images)

Because there were no rankings points on offer at Wimbledon, Kyrgios has been robbed of a rise to World No.15.

Instead he has fallen five places to No.45 due to the decision of the ATP and WTA tours to strip Wimbledon of rankings points in retaliation to the All England Club's ban on from players from Russia and Belarus.

The stand has backfired spectacularly, with Novak Djokovic also dropping from No.3 to No.7 just one day after winning his seventh Wimbledon crown and fourth in a row.

The rankings fiasco threatens to cost Kyrgios an all-important seeding for the year's final major at the US Open, which starts in New York on August 29.

Ordinarily, Kyrgios would have soared to No.15 in the world after his run to the Wimbledon final, placing him in position to claim a top-16 seeding at Flushing Meadows.

That would have ensured the 27-year-old couldn't possibly run into a higher-ranked rival until at least the fourth round.

But unless he climbs the rankings in the next month when he plans a well-earned break, Kyrgios will be at the mercy of the draw and could still strike any number of big-name rivals in the opening round.

with AAP

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