'It's insulting': Uproar over shock detail in photo of Ash Barty

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·Sports Editor
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Ash Barty, pictured here in front of the Ladies' Singles Winner's Board at Wimbledon.
Ash Barty poses with the Venus Rosewater Dish in front of the Ladies' Singles Winner's Board after winning Wimbledon. (Photo by AELTC/THOMAS LOVELOCK/POOL/AFP via Getty Images)

There are calls for Wimbledon to change an "outdated" tradition highlighted in a photo of Ash Barty on Saturday.

The World No.1 etched her name onto the Wimbledon champion's board after a pulsating three-set victory over Karolina Pliskova in the final.

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In doing so, Barty became the first Australian woman to win Wimbledon since her idol Evonne Goolagong Cawley in 1980.

In the aftermath, Barty saw her name join some of the all-time greats of women's tennis on the official Wimbledon champion's board at the All England Club.

But fans noticed a bizarre detail as Barty posed for photos in front of the board on Saturday.

Goolagong Cawley's triumph in 1980 is recognised near the top left of the board, however her name is written as 'Mrs R Cawley'.

Despite her first name being Evonne, the 'R' stands for Goolagong Cawley's husband Roger.

But that's not nearly as bad as the way Chris Evert's triumph in 1981 is recognised.

Right underneath Cawley's name, Evert's victory is marked as 'Mrs J.M Lloyd' for her former husband John Lloyd.

Evonne Goolagong Cawley and Chris Evert's triumphs, pictured here recognised by their husband's names.
Evonne Goolagong Cawley and Chris Evert's triumphs are recognised by their husband's names. (Photo by AELTC/THOMAS LOVELOCK/POOL/AFP via Getty Images)

So not only does Evert not get her first initial on the board, she doesn't even get her last name.

Writing for The Roar, Paul Dennett said: "Surely Wimbledon must do away with such outdated and insulting styling."

"It is time to rewrite the honours board. Remove all the anachronistic instances of ‘Miss’ and ‘Mrs’ and get rid of the initials of female players’ husbands. ‘Miss. R. Cawley’ should be ‘Evonne Goolagong-Cawley’ and ‘Miss. J.M. Lloyd’ should be ‘Chris Evert’."

Greg Jericho of The Guardian Australia tweeted: "Seriously, Wimbledon - go back and change the Winners Honour Roll."

And they certainly weren't alone, with many others weighing in on social media.

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Goolagong Cawley's tribute to Ash Barty

Goolagong Cawley paid a heartfelt tribute to "little sister" Barty on Sunday, saying she just sensed it was "her time" to win Wimbledon during NAIDOC week.

In a poignant gesture to her Indigenous idol and mentor, Barty wore a FILA dress inspired by Goolagong's 1971 Wimbledon outfit.

"Oh she certainly did," the former World No.1 said when asked if Barty had made her proud.

"She made me proud from the first time I saw Ash. She must have been about 13.

"She was playing at the Australian Open and (my husband) Roger and I stayed and watched for a bit and we saw one whole point where she showed all the skills.

"She did the slice, the volley, the smash. Everything in one game and we both just looked at each other and thought 'oh, she's got it, she's going to be our next champion'.

"So look at her now."

with AAP

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