'What a moment': Teenager stuns Wimbledon in epic 19-year first

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Emma Raducanu, pictured here in action at Wimbledon.
Emma Raducanu has stunned the tennis world at Wimbledon. Image: Getty

British teenager Emma Raducanu has sent tennis fans into a frenzy after shocking former French Open runner-up Marketa Vondrousova to reach the third round on her Wimbledon debut.

Ranked 338th in the world, the 18-year-old wildcard completely outplayed her Czech opponent to win 6-2 6-4, following up her first-round victory the previous day over Vitalia Diatchenko.

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In doing so she became the youngest British woman to reach the third round at Wimbledon since Elena Baltacha in 2002.

The Canadian-born youngster, whose father is Romanian and mother Chinese, fell behind 0-3 in the second set but calmly regained control to outclass a befuddled Vondrousova.

"I think playing in front of a home crowd definitely helps," Raducanu said.

"Also I was just thinking, play every point like it was my last point, like it was match point, it was my last point here at Wimbledon."

Judging by the way Raducanu has stepped up to the big stage, two months after completing her A-levels at school, this could be the first of many.

Basking in the limelight of her unlikely run, Raducanu said she would prefer to reach the fourth round rather than receive top grades in her school exams.

Raducanu came to Britain aged two with her parents, both of whom have watched her this week.

Emma Raducanu, pictured here smiling as she walks off court at Wimbledon.
Emma Raducanu smiles as she walks off court at Wimbledon. (Photo by Mike Hewitt/Getty Images)

She next plays the experienced Romanian Sorana Cirstea, who upset 12th seed Victoria Azarenka in three sets on Thursday.

Raducanu is not afraid of a challenge, having tried go-karting, to motocross, ballet, tap dancing and horse riding before tennis got the nod.

However, her parents were under the impression her No.1 priority was to get A-grades - which under 10 per cent of the students taking A levels achieve.

"I'd have to say round four of Wimbledon," said Raducanu when asked whether she would prefer two A-stars or beat Cirstea.

"I think anyone that knows me would be like, What? Everyone thinks I'm absolutely fanatic about my school results.

"They think I have such an inflated ego about it. Actually, I would say I have high standards of myself.

"That's helped me get to where I am in terms of tennis and also in terms of school results."

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Emma Raducanu gets insane Wimbledon payday

Raducanu was only handed a wildcard into the main draw at late notice but is now assured at the very least of £115,000 (AU$212,000) for reaching the third round - around four times her career earnings to date of $53,000.

"I think it's quite incredible really," she said about the amount of prize money.

"I think for me, I'll definitely use it. I'm sort of at the beginning of my career, just tapping into great coaches.

"Tennis is an expensive sport. To travel and compete week in, week out, it's definitely going to go towards funding that."

She says she always felt she could compete at the top level but injuries and little niggles kept on halting her progress.

"I kept that belief that once I had the opportunity to go out and play, given such an opportunity to play at The Championships, I had that intrinsic belief I could do it," she said.

with agencies

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