Wimbledon dress code strikes again in awkward wardrobe malfunction

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·Sports Editor
·3-min read
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Oscar Otte, pictured here struggling with the shorts he was wearing at Wimbledon.
Oscar Otte wasn't impressed with the shorts he was wearing at Wimbledon. Image: Eurosport

Wimbledon's strict dress code appeared to strike again on Wednesday when two male players struggled with the shorts they were wearing.

Oscar Otte and Antoine Hoang both decided to change their shorts in the middle of their matches, with both complaining that they were too big.

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Wimbledon requires players to wear all-white outfits at the grass-court grand slam, but Otte and Hoang appeared to struggle with the strict tradition.

After the first set of his match against Andy Murray on Centre Court, Otte could be heard asking the chair umpire to put in a request to get him some new shorts.

The German player could be heard complaining to chair umpire Aurelie Tourte that they were too big and kept falling down.

Tourte rang through to someone behind the scenes, who obliged and brought Otte some new ones from the Wimbledon shop.

However Otte didn't seem overly impressed by the new ones either.

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He wasn't the only player to have wardrobe problems on Wednesday, with Hoang also forced to make a mid-match change.

The Frenchman's shorts were also too loose in his match against Sebastian Korda, which resulted in tennis balls falling out during points.

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Wimbledon dress code strikes again

The comical scenes came after Dutch player Indy de Vroome fell foul of the strict dress code during qualifying last week.

The 25-year-old was in action at the qualifying tournament in Roehampton when she was pulled up by the tournament supervisor.

De Vroome posted a photo on social media showing her being told off for the hat she was wearing.

“The ref telling me that the inside of my cap isn’t white enough,” De Vroome wrote.

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Under rule No.7 of Wimbledon’s official dress code: “Caps (including the underbill), headbands, bandanas, wristbands and socks must be completely white except for a single trim of colour no wider than one centimetre.”

Wimbledon officials have cracked down on outfits in recent years after players started to add too much colour to their ensembles throughout the 1980s and 90s.

A number of players have even been forced to change their underwear if it can be seen through clothing.

“Any undergarments that either are or can be visible during play (including due to perspiration) must also be completely white except for a single trim of colour no wider than one centimetre,” Rule No.9 reads.

“In addition, common standards of decency are required at all times.”

Aussie star John Millman famously had to get his father to rush out and buy him new underwear at the 2018 tournament.

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