Nick Kyrgios fumes over umpire's controversial act in US Open clash

·Sports Editor
·4-min read
Nick Kyrgios and Eva Asderaki-Moore, pictured here during his clash with Daniil Medvedev at the US Open.
Nick Kyrgios wasn't happy with Eva Asderaki-Moore during his clash with Daniil Medvedev at the US Open. Image: Getty

Nick Kyrgios took aim at umpire Eva Asderaki-Moore early in his fourth-round victory over Daniil Medvedev at the US Open.

Kyrgios and Medvedev were locked in a tight battle in the first set on Sunday when the Aussie was left fuming that he'd been hit with a time violation warning while serving.

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Kyrgios suggested that Asderaki-Moore was starting the service clock too early, particularly after a number of long rallies in hot and humid conditions.

"You are the only umpire that I've a problem in this matter," Kyrgios shot at the umpire.

Nick Kyrgios, pictured here speaking to the chair umpire during his clash with Daniil Medvedev at the US Open.
Nick Kyrgios speaks to the chair umpire during his clash with Daniil Medvedev at the US Open. (Photo by Sarah Stier/Getty Images)

"I get back from the box and there’s like six seconds. I’ve never had a problem with it at this tournament apart from with you."

Kyrgios is one of the fastest players between serves on tour and rarely gets pinged for falling foul of the shot clock.

Speaking in commentary for Channel 9, Aussie great Todd Woodbridge pointed out that some umpires start the shot clock as soon as the previous point ends, while others give the players a couple of seconds of respite.

Spectators weren't happy with Kyrgios' complaints, loudly booing the Aussie star during his tirade.

The Aussie prevailed in a titanic first-set tie-breaker to take the lead in the match, winning it 13-11.

He then pulled off one of the biggest victories of his career, taking down Medvedev 7-6 (13-11) 3-6 6-3 6-2 to advance to the quarter-finals at the US Open for the first time in his career.

Matteo Berrettini and Casper Ruud advance at US Open

Earlier on Sunday, Matteo Berrettini reached his second-consecutive US Open quarter-final by winning a marathon battle with injury-hit Alejandro Davidovich Fokina.

The Italian prevailed 3-6 7-6 (7-2) 6-3 4-6 6-2, but only after Davidovich Fokina suffered an injury in the final set.

Berrettini set up a last-eight date with Norwegian Casper Ruud, who earned a 6-1 6-2 6-7 (4-7) 6-2 win over Corentin Moutet in his first appearance at the Arthur Ashe Stadium.

The 13th seed Berrettini had lost to the Spaniard Davidovich Fokina on clay in Monte Carlo last year but eventually found the right formula on New York's hard courts, sending down 17 aces, firing 48 winners to 27 and saving nine of 13 break points.

After a lacklustre first set in which Berrettini produced only six winners and failed to earn a break point, the Australian Open semi-finalist came to life in the second set tiebreak and immediately broke his opponent in the third set.

Down a break in the final set, Davidovich Fokina suffered an injury in the sixth game when his leg slipped out from under him and he banged his fists on the court in pain.

He saw a physio and for a moment it seemed he might be done for the day, but the Spaniard bravely returned to the court to finish the match to roars of encouragement from the crowd.

"I'm really proud because I didn't start the match the way I wanted to," said Berrettini, who has been sidelined a number of times this season due to injuries or illness, including a withdrawal after a positive Covid test from this year's Wimbledon.

"Obviously this is not the way I wanted to finish the match but I'm going to take the win."

Fifth seed Ruud, already the first Norwegian man to appear in the third and fourth rounds at the US Open, must reach the final for at least the opportunity to become the first world No.1 from that country.

with AAP

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