'Finally over': Shayna Jack 'returning' after doping ban is halved

Australian Associated Press
·4-min read
Seen here, Shayna Jack competing in swimming for Australia.
Shayna Jack has consistently denied knowingly taking the banned drug Ligandrol. Pic: Getty

Australian swimmer Shayna Jack has had a four-year doping suspension halved after it was found she did not intentionally use a banned substance.

The Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) ruled on Monday that Jack serve a two-year ban after returning a positive sample to Ligandrol.

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Jack was originally suspended for a maximum four years despite pleading her innocence during an Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority hearing.

The 22-year-old returned a positive sample in an out-of-competition test at an Australian team training camp in June 2019 as she prepared for the world championships in South Korea.

In handing down its finding, CAS said Jack did not knowingly take Ligandrol.

Shayna Jack is pictured here facing questions about her doping ban.
Shayna Jack had her four-year ban halved after an appeal heard by CAS. Pic: Getty

"The sole arbitrator in charge of this matter found, on the balance of probabilities, that Shayna Jack did not intentionally ingest Ligandrol and considered that she had discharged her onus of proving that the anti-doping rule violation was not intentional."

Ligandrol is supposed to add muscle mass without the side-effects of steroids.

Jack's ban will be backdated to the start of her provisional suspension from July, 2019 and she can return to competition in July next year.

In statement released on social media, Jack said was looking forward to returning to the pool.

‘This ordeal is finally over’

"The CAS have confirmed in emphatic terms that I did not intentionally, knowingly or recklessly use Ligandrol in any manner," she posted on Instagram.

"I have proven that I have not ever cheated, nor used prohibited substances intentionally or knowingly.

"I will still incur two years out of the sport in which I love. I cannot change the rules and the rules will remain as they are for the time being.

"Therefore, I accept this decision with a positive attitude and with gratitude that my career as a swimmer will resume next year.

"I have never doubted myself for a minute throughout this ordeal and I have never allowed my integrity to be compromised.

"I walk a little taller tonight with the fact that this ordeal is finally over.

"I am returning to swimming - the sport that I have loved all my life and the sport that I will cherish just that little bit more ongoing."

Jack broke down in tears on an episode of SAS Australia earlier this month after being asked about her doping scandal and suspension from the Australian swimming team.

“I’ve swum my whole life and never done anything different,” Jack said.

“A year and a bit ago, I got accused of taking drugs, which I’d never do, ever.

“I was just going into a training camp prior to the World Championships in 2019. They did just a regular drug test. It was normal for me to get drug tested, so I didn’t think anything of it.

“Then they called up the head coach, and that was it. I got sent home and they gave me a four-year ban from swimming, which would be the end of my career.”

Jack broke down in tears when asked what it would mean if she never swum for Australia again.

“That’s probably the hardest question anyone could ever ask me, because I’ve never thought about anything else but swimming,” she said.

“I can’t go see my coach, I can’t just go swim with my squad, I can’t go and play another sport just for fun.

“I just want to be able to go back to swimming and love swimming again. And sometimes I forget how strong I am, and it does get to me a fair bit.”

with Yahoo Sport staff

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