Transgender weightlifter's classy act amid 'shameful' Olympics drama

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Pictured here, Laurel Hubbard's touching gesture came after she failed to complete a successful lift.
Laurel Hubbard's touching gesture came after she failed to complete a successful lift in shattering scenes. Pic: Getty

Laurel Hubbard's inclusion in the women's weightlifting competition was one of the most fiercely debated subjects before and during the Tokyo Olympic Games.

On Monday night, the transgender weightlifter's Olympic dream came to a heartbreaking end in the women’s 87+ kilogram competition.

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Hubbard failed on her first attempt to get 120kg above her head, bailing out early. On her second attempt at 125kg, she was able to get the weight up and pumped her fist after in satisfaction, however judges ruled it a “no lift.”

She returned quickly for another attempt at 125kg only to fail to stand up with the weight above her head. 

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Three attempts - all of them unsuccessful - meant Hubbard's competition was over before she even got a chance in the clean and jerk section.

Hubbard was the only one of the 13 finalists to not complete at least one lift.

Despite the controversy surrounding the Kiwi athlete's participation in Tokyo, and the heartbreaking way in which she exited the Games, Hubbard showed tremendous class with a touching gesture afterwards.

Hubbard patted her chest and made a heart shape with her hands as a signal to those in attendance and, presumably, the millions watching around the world.

Laurel Hubbard is seen here, making a heart symbol with her hands to thank supporters.
Laurel Hubbard made a heart symbol with her hands to thank supporters after a sad exit at the Olympics. Pic: Getty

“Thank you so very much for your interest in my humble sporting performance tonight,” Hubbard said to the media. 

“I know from a sporting perspective I did not live up to the standards I put upon myself.”

Hubbard went on to thank fans in New Zealand, the Japanese people and a number of sports organisations including the Federation of International Gymnastics and the New Zealand Olympic Committee.

“I know my participation in these games has not been entirely without controversy,” Hubbard said, mentioning some “quite difficult times.”

She then praised the International Olympic Committee for letting her compete in Tokyo.

“[The IOC has] been extraordinarily supportive and I think that they have reaffirmed the principles of the Olympics that sport is something that all people around the world can do, that it is inclusive and successful,” Hubbard said.

She took no questions from the media.

Hubbard has generated enormous attention in the run-up to the 87+kg finals. 

Her presence has sparked debates about whether transgender athletes should be included, and by what standards, in the Olympics against concerns about what is fair to the other competitors.

Reaction to Hubbard at the Tokyo Games was typically divided.

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Transgender debate rages on

In the middle is limited scientific research concerning the advantages for the transgender athletes, especially those who didn’t transition until after they went through puberty as a male.

The International Olympic Committee has said it will unveil a new framework on the issue soon, calling its current policy “outdated.”

In the interim, Hubbard took the stage here inside a theatre in central Tokyo, where no fans but plenty of media from around the world were there to watch.

What advantages Hubbard had were impossible to know, especially in lieu of her performance.

She stood out on age alone, though; at 43, she was by far the oldest of the 13 finalists. American Sarah Elizabeth Robles was 33, but everyone else was in their 20s, including six competitors aged 21 or younger.

Hubbard didn’t transition to female until she was 35.

The IOC is still wrestling with the issue. Its guidance will determine the standards applied by many individual sports federations, such as, in this case, the International Weightlifting Federation.

"What's really important to remember is that trans women are women,” said Richard Budgett, director of the IOC’s medical and scientific department. “And so, in the spirit of inclusion in sport, if at all possible, they should be included in sport.

“It's only where there's evidence of real concern — that that would lead to a disproportionate performance advantage for those individuals — should any rules and regulations come in to change that eligibility,” Budgett said. “The IOC is determined to increase inclusion in sport as one of the fundamentals, but at the same time our highest, highest priority is fairness."

The challenge for the IOC is determining that “fairness.”

Seen here, New Zealand's Laurel Hubbard competes in the women's +87kg group A final weightlifting event at the Olympic Games.
New Zealand's Laurel Hubbard competes in the women's +87kg group A final weightlifting event at the Olympic Games in Tokyo.

Transgender women competing in elite competitions are so rare that experts say they are still making assumptions, especially when trying to determine allowable amounts of hormones in the athlete.

There are also variances in different sports and even different events within a sport. Do transgender athletes have greater endurance? Strength? Stamina? The list goes on.

"What might be true for rowing and this specific discipline — where potentially testosterone or other aspects come into play in order to justify the reasons there is a disproportionate advantage — might be totally irrelevant in another context,” said Katie Mascagni, the IOC’s head of public affairs.

A transgender athlete competing in a sport such as weightlifting is simply competing against the bar. She can play no defence or prevent anyone else from doing their best. The sport is already divided up into weight classes.

with agencies

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