Brooks Koepka breaks his silence after backflip on LIV golf

  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
·Sports Reporter
·4-min read
In this article:
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
Brooks Koepka has explained his decision to backflip and join the LIV Invitational Series, claiming injuries and family committments were behind the move. (Photo by Jonathan Ferrey/LIV Golf via Getty Images)
Brooks Koepka has explained his decision to backflip and join the LIV Invitational Series, claiming injuries and family committments were behind the move. (Photo by Jonathan Ferrey/LIV Golf via Getty Images)

Just a few short months ago, Brooks Koepka claimed the LIV Invitational series would be filled out by a few 'sell-outs' who turned their back on the PGA Tour.

How quickly things, and as Koepka himself pointed out, opinions change.

OUCH: Golf stars cop whopping fine after joining breakaway LIV league

WOW: Golf fans spot staggering detail in new photo of Tiger Woods

Koepka stunned the golfing world when it was revealed he had signed with the lucrative competition, whose signing bonuses and prizemoney have lured a few more players than expected away from the PGA.

This is despite threats of suspensions and even bans from the PGA, which have not dissuaded the likes of Koepka and Dustin Johnson from accepting mult-million dollar signing bonuses.

The LIV series, which has also been heavily supported by Australian golfing great Greg Norman, is backed by the ultra-wealthy Saudi Arabia sovereign wealth fund.

Koepka, in his first comments since it emerged he was joining the breakaway series, said his opinion had changed since his initial comments several months ago.

The 32-year-old cited a troublesome knee injury, as well as a desire to look after his family and spend more time at home with them, as the major reasons behind his backflip.

"Opinions change. I feel very comfortable with the decision I made. I'm happy, and did what's best for me," Koepka said.

Koepka also took the opportunity to respond to criticism from key rival Rory McIlroy, who criticised him for '(saying) one thing and then (doing) another thing."

To this, Koepka simply said both men shouldn't be criticised for making decisions they felt were in the best interests of their families - even though they might not see eye-to-eye on the reasons why.

"Look, he's entitled to his opinion. He can think whatever he wants," Koepka responded.

"He's going to do what's best for him and his family, I'm going to do what's best for me and my family. Can't hate on anybody for that, and like I said, opinions change, man."

LIV Golf controversy contines as first American event approaches

Charl Schwartzel won the inaugural event outside London and took home $4.75 million ($A6.88m). LIV tournaments are played over 54 holes with no cut, and even the last-place finisher gets paid.

The PGA Tour has sought to fight off the threat posed by LIV Golf by disciplining players. The tour suspended every active member who competed in the first LIV event.

Those who play in the first LIV event on American soil in Oregon will also be suspended unless they resign their tour memberships.

Three-time PGA Tour winner Pat Perez, who also spoke against LIV Golf before changing his mind, said the PGA Tour's tactics have backfired.

"You want to be able to play anywhere you want. And you should be able to play wherever you want," Perez said.

"The (PGA) Tour has tried to strong-arm us all year and come with bans and suspensions and all that, and how'd that work? Look how many guys are here. That didn't work at all."

Brooks Kopeka has signed up to the LIV Invitational Series, despite claiming months earlier that players who did would would be 'selling out'. (Photo by Jonathan Ferrey/LIV Golf via Getty Images)
Brooks Kopeka has signed up to the LIV Invitational Series, despite claiming months earlier that players who did would would be 'selling out'. (Photo by Jonathan Ferrey/LIV Golf via Getty Images)

Players like Ian Poulter, Lee Westwood and Sergio Garcia all joined the Saudi-backed breakaway venture at Hertfordshire earlier this month despite not having received releases to do so.

The PGA Tour immediately indefinitely banned all its members within minutes of the players teeing off at Centurion Club but the DP World Tour delayed making a decision.

However, citing a breach of regulations it has now imposed sanctions, which in addition to the six-figure sum fines includes removing all involved from the Scottish Open, which is held the week before the 150th Open Championship at St Andrews, plus the Barbasol Championship the same week as the Scottish Open and the Barracuda Championship (the week of the Open).

The DP World Tour also said any subsequent involvement in the LIV Golf Series, whose next event starts in Portland, Oregon, next week, may result in additional punishments.

With Yahoo Sport US

Click here to sign up to our newsletter for all the latest and breaking stories from Australia and around the world.

Our goal is to create a safe and engaging place for users to connect over interests and passions. In order to improve our community experience, we are temporarily suspending article commenting