Frightening crash angle shows Lewis Hamilton's lucky F1 escape

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·Sports Reporter
·4-min read
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Newly released footage from last weekend's Italian GP showed just how close the rear left wheel of Max Verstappen's car came to F1 champion Lewis Hamilton during their collision. Pictures: F1/Twitter/Getty Images
Newly released footage from last weekend's Italian GP showed just how close the rear left wheel of Max Verstappen's car came to F1 champion Lewis Hamilton during their collision. Pictures: F1/Twitter/Getty Images

Newly released footage showing a new angle of Max Verstappen's collision with Formula 1 rival Lewis Hamilton last weekend has frighteningly demonstrated the risks of racing.

Mercedes world champion Hamilton fortunately walked away from the crash at last weekend's Italian Grand Prix, in which Verstappen's Red Bull was launched over the back of Hamilton's car.

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The right rear wheel of Verstappen's car made contact with Hamilton's helmet as it crashed over the top of the Mercedes, with the halo device thankfully sparing Hamilton of serious injury.

The crash between the two championship rivals marks another flashpoint in an increasingly acrimonious season, with tensions often on show between the rival teams.

Australian driver Daniel Ricciardo was unbothered by the chaos unfolding behind him, having sensationally managed to steal the lead from Verstappen heading into the first corner.

The McLaren racer, who has struggled for much of the season otherwise, earned his first race win since 2018, with teammate Lando Norris making it a 1-2 finish for the team.

While it was a popular result among fans, debate has continued to rage over who was more at fault in the Verstappen-Hamilton crash.

The Monza stewards blamed championship leader Verstappen and handed the Dutch 23-year-old a three place grid drop for the next race in Russia.

The FIA later announced it would launch an investigation into the 'unusual' crash, with F1 race director saying it was still important to examine the relatively low-speed impact.

"Incidents that are different, so it's not necessarily high G impacts or anything like that, but are unusual, we do look at," said Masi.

"Our safety department does look at them in detail, investigate and see what we can learn and what we can improve for the future. That's how we have a whole lot of the safety features that we have today, and will continue to evolve into the future.

"We are already collecting all of the data, so we have all of the information and that will all go to our safety department together with any photographs and anything else we have along the way."

F1 debate continues over Verstappen-Hamilton crash at Italian GP

Ross Brawn, F1 boss, said: "It's clear both drivers could have avoided it. It's another consequence of two guys going head to head and not wanting to give an inch.

"It's a shame they ended up in the gravel because it could have shaped up to be a great race - and we were deprived of that.

"I wouldn't say it has changed the dynamic - you've got two cockerels in the farmyard at the moment and we are seeing the consequence of it - and I don't think either will back off at any moment for the rest of the year. But I hope the championship is won on the track, not in the barriers or the stewards room."

Max Verstappen's collision with championship rival earned him a three-place grid penalty for the upcoming Russian Grand Prix. (Photo by Peter Van Egmond/Getty Images)
Max Verstappen's collision with championship rival earned him a three-place grid penalty for the upcoming Russian Grand Prix. (Photo by Peter Van Egmond/Getty Images)

Hamilton said it had been a shock to be hit on the head and the titanium ring had saved his life.

FIA president Jean Todt posted on Twitter a photograph of the Red Bull on top of the Mercedes with the comment "Glad the halo was there".

Several F1 drivers have credited the device for saving their lives, including Ferrari's Charles Leclerc and former Haas racer Romain Grosjean.

"I wasn't for the halo some years ago but I think it's the greatest thing that we brought to Formula One," he said after the device shielded his head when his car penetrated the barriers in fiery crash in Bahrain last year.

With AAP

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