Tennis star facing $94,000 fine over controversial act at French Open

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Facundo Bagnis, pictured here clearly injured in his first-round clash with Daniil Medvedev at the French Open.
Facundo Bagnis was clearly injured in his first-round clash with Daniil Medvedev at the French Open. Image: Getty

Facundo Bagnis is facing the possibility of being docked his first-round prize money at the French Open after he was clearly injured while playing Daniil Medvedev on Tuesday.

The Argentine's calf was heavily strapped before the match even started, and he collapsed to the court in pain after a serve in the second set.

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Bagnis went on to lose 6-2 6-2 6-2 to World No.2 Medvedev in less than 100 minutes, raising eyebrows around the tennis world.

The Argentine also retired hurt with the same calf problem in Geneva last week, raising questions about whether he should have been playing at the French Open at all.

Sam Smith said on Eurosport: "Is he alright? That is not a good sign!

"He is going to really hurt himself if he keeps going.

"Goodness me, that leg did not stand up at all. He can't land on it!"

Fellow commentator Mark Petchey said: "Calves are notorious. I said it right at the start - they do not heal quickly and they get weaker once you have torn them once.

Facundo Bagnis, pictured here clearly injured against Daniil Medvedev at the French Open.
Facundo Bagnis was clearly injured against Daniil Medvedev at the French Open. (Photo by ANNE-CHRISTINE POUJOULAT/AFP via Getty Images)

"This is not the smartest decision by Bagnis. I know there is a lot of money on the line, but this is genuinely not the smartest decision he has taken this week to play.

"This is swing and a miss stuff from Bagnis at the moment."

The Grand Slam Board has the power to take action against players who don't give their full effort, under rules that were implemented in recent years to stop injured players entering grand slams just for the prize money.

Because Bagnis was clearly injured from the outset, he is now facing the possibility of being stripped his $94,550 prize money for making the first round.

Daniil Medvedev makes bright start at French Open

Given this was Medvedev's first clay-court match of the season following hernia surgery, he might have preferred a tougher workout.

He will now play Serbian Laslo Djere, a clay-court specialist who beat Ricardas Berankis 6-4 6-4 6-4.

Djere won his only previous meeting with Medvedev in Budapest on clay five years ago, though the Russian did retire at 0-6 5-5.

Meanwhile, Denis Shapovalov lost 6-3 6-1 6-4 7-6 (7-4) to promising youngster Holger Rune.

"I didn't really show up today, so it's a little bit difficult," he said.

"Of course, Holger is playing some great tennis, he won his first title, he's pushing some top guys.

"So not taking anything away from him. But I think against most players today I wouldn't come out the winner."

Denis Shapovalov, pictured here in action against Holger Rune at the French Open.
Denis Shapovalov in action against Holger Rune at the French Open. (Photo by Antonio Borga/Eurasia Sport Images/Getty Images)

Russian seventh seed Andrey Rublev survived a first-set scare to move past Kwon Soon-woo, winning 6-7 (5) 6-3 6-2 6-4

The 24-year-old let his frustrations boil over after losing the first-set breaker, angrily whacked a ball that struck his chair and narrowly missed the head of a groundsman.

World No.8 Casper Ruud beat Jo-Wilfried Tsonga in four sets, with the French veteran breaking down in tears in the final match of his career.

And Frances Tiafoe finally earned his first victory at the French Open.

The 24th-ranked American beat Benjamin Bonzi 7-5 7-5 7-6 (7-5) for his first win at Roland Garros after six first-round defeats.

with AAP

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