New footage emerges of Socceroos goalkeeper in shameless act

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·Sports Reporter
·4-min read
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Socceroos goalie Andrew Redmayne's tactics during the penalty shootout against Peru were much more nuanced than it would seem. Pictures: Movistar/Getty Images
Socceroos goalie Andrew Redmayne's tactics during the penalty shootout against Peru were much more nuanced than it would seem. Pictures: Movistar/Getty Images

Just how cunning Socceroos goalkeeper Andrew Redmayne was in his management of penalty routines has been revealed with new camera angles showing just what he was up to.

Redmayne etched his name into Socceroos history when his save against Peru booked Australia a place in the 2022 FIFA World Cup later this year.

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Eyebrows were raised when he was subbed into the penalty shootout in favour of starting goalkeeper Mat Ryan - but it proved to be a masterstroke from coach Graham Arnold.

The bearded keeper's unconventional dancing routine on the goal line forced one miss and helped him save the second, but Redmayne was keeping himself busy in between penalties.

As Australia's Craig Goodwin lined up for the third penalty, Redmayne seized the opportunity to hurl Peruvian keeper Pedro Gallese's drink bottle, which had been covered in notes on each of the Australian players, over the fence.

Wanting to be thorough in his work, Redmayne collected the notes from the ground after they'd detatched from the bottle mid-air and pocketed them.

The cheeky and probably unpopular move in Peru was picked up and shared by Movistar Deportes.

It was far from his only work in disrupting Peru's rythmn and maintaining Australia's, with football psychology researcher Geir Jordet from the Norwegian School of Sports Sciences detailing a list of subtle acts on Twitter.

He detailed several ways in which Redmayne had controlled the flow of proceedings, from other acts of messing with Peruvian players and acting as a 'bodyguard' for his own.

Jordet suggested some of the tactics might have been inspired by methods used by England during the 2018 World Cup - in particular how Redmayne himself would hand the ball to his teammate before each of their kicks.

This was in order for each player to see a friendly face before beginning their pre-shot routine to help ease any nerves, a tactic also used by Liverpool.

Similarly, Redmayne was an absolute pest when it came to giving the ball to the opponent, at one point offering it to Peru's Alexander Callens before dropping it at his feet and kicking it away slightly.

"The show of disrespect is clear and obvious," Jordet said.

Andrew Redmayne's penalty tactics exposed after triumph

Redmayne again showed he was wide awake to the game-playing that could come from his opposite number, standing in between Australian players setting up for their kick until the opposite keeper was in goal.

Finally, Jordet pointed out the incredibly long time Redmayne took to ready himself for the deciding penalty.

“For the final shot, Redmayne takes forever to get to the goal line, forcing the ref to delay his whistle & the penalty taker to wait 18 seconds after having placed the ball and walked back,” Jordet wrote in his thread.

By saving the Peruvians' sixth penalty attempt, Redmayne catapulted the Socceroos to a fifth-straight World Cup and himself into the history books.

But Redmayne said he was unsure whether he'd get a chance to reprise his role as the Socceroos' 11th hour hero at the World Cup in November.

"We're miles away from talking about that," he told reporters at Sydney airport, after an emotional reunion with wife Cailin and young daughter Poppy.

"We're still relishing the win. It's been a long, arduous campaign and we're just glad to see the end of it with success."

Socceroos goalkeeper Andrew Redmayne was reunited with his daughter when the team touched down in Australia on Wednesday. (Photo by Matt King/Getty Images)
Socceroos goalkeeper Andrew Redmayne was reunited with his daughter when the team touched down in Australia on Wednesday. (Photo by Matt King/Getty Images)

While Ryan said Arnold had previously discussed the possibility of switching goalkeepers if a qualifier went to penalties, the skipper admitted he was surprised when the plan was put into action.

"I had no idea," Ryan said, "I was preparing myself as if I was going to go into the penalty shoot out.

"Full credit to 'Redders', he went out there and he produced when we needed to.

"A lot of people probably wrote us off and didn't give us a chance to go through but hopefully (the win) can inspire the younger generation out there to go and chase their dreams."

With AAP

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