World Cup reporter's devastating TV reveal after death of mother

Nadia Nadim is seen on the left, and on the right is pictured with her late mother Hamida.
Footballer and World Cup broadcaster Nadia Nadim has return to the air, a week after the tragic death of her mother Hamida back home in Denmark. Pictures: ITV/Twitter

A broadcaster at the FIFA World Cup has bravely spoken on air for the first time since losing her mother in a truck crash while on the air in Qatar. Nadia Nadim, a professional star from Denmark, has been in Qatar on commentary duties for British broadcaster ITV, and was informed of the devastating news last week.

Danish authorities reported Hamida Nadim had been killed when her car was hit from behind by a digger.

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Tragically, she had been travelling home from the gym in order to watch her daughter broadcasting from Qatar.

Nadim took seven days off from her hosting duties for ITV in the wake of the horrible news, but made a stirring return earlier this week. She took the opportunity to speak about the impact her mother had made on her life, and said it was important to be brave in the face of devastating circumstances.

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“My mum unfortunately passed away last Tuesday, very unexpectedly in an accident. She was a very strong women, who not only inspired me, but a lot of people around her,' Nadim said.

“I’m obviously sad, but she raised us to be strong and we’re showing how to be strong. I want to make her proud and I know she wanted me to be here.

“I remember when the accident happened, she had said she was going to go to the gym earlier, so she could see the show, so the reason I’m here is to make her proud.”

Support for Nadim flooded social media, with fans hoping to give her every bit of support as she continues her work in light of the deeply upsetting turn of events.

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The 33-year-old is originally from Afghanistan, and fled to Denmark in 2000 after her father was executed by the Taliban, travelling with her mother and four sisters. The family sold everything they owned to escape the country.

Having developed a passion for football whilst in a refugee camp in Denmark, Nadim has since gone on to star as a striker for the national team, as well as for Paris St Germain and Manchester City. She is also a qualified doctor.

Denmark wary of offensively-minded Socceroos in World Cup clash

Denmark coach Kasper Hjulmand expects Australia to attack, and attack hard, in their decisive World Cup fixture in Qatar.

While the Australians could advance to the knockout phase with a draw, Denmark must win at Al Janoub Stadium to progress - should favourites France beat Tunisia as expected. But Hjulmand is under no illusions about what mentality the Socceroos will carry.

"They will come out strong against us," he told reporters. "They won't just be sitting. They will run against us, we will be put under pressure.

"They will try to get close to us and get close in the duels and I don't just expect them to be sitting and waiting."

Hjulmand said the Australians would know the dangers of playing for a draw.

"I definitely expect them to also attack," he said.

"Like all football games, there will be times when we have to break down a very strong defensive unit - they have been very close in their organisation.

"And that is the toughest thing in football, to break down an organisation like that."

While the Danish team is studded with stars from top European leagues, the Socceroos are largely comprised of players from second-tier competitions.

With AAP

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