FIFA World Cup accomodation in Qatar raises eyebrows

Press were given a tour of FIFA World Cup accomodation village El-Amadi, with the results raising some eyebrows. Pictures: Getty Images
Press were given a tour of FIFA World Cup accomodation village El-Amadi, with the results raising some eyebrows. Pictures: Getty Images

Fans have been given a glimpse at some of the bespoke accomodation ahead of the FIFA World Cup in Qatar - and suffice it to say, people are underwhelmed.

According to estimates from organisers, more than 130,000 rooms are expected to be used by football fanatics travelling for the tournament, which is set to get underway in the coming weeks.

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With hundreds of thousands of fans expected to attend the World Cup, the relatively small Middle Eastern nation has been up against the clock to get enough accomodation prepared.

Portable rooms made from shipping containers are expected to host as many as 60,000 fans when play begins in a fortnight, with reporters getting an inside look at the Al-Emadi fan village.

The fan quarters raised plenty of eyebrows, with either two single beds or one double packed into a relatively cramped space.

Toilets, tea and coffee making facilities and a mini-fridge are also found.

The Associated Press said the Al-Emadi site spanned over 3.1 square kilometres, with a temporary convenience store and restaurant also planned - however though the village has purpose built transport thanks to a metro station and bus stop, fans still face travel times of at least 40 minutes to reach various stadiums.

Construction efforts in Qatar to prepare for the 2022 World Cup have come under international scrutiny.

Human rights fears raised ahead of FIFA World Cup in Qatar

In 2010, Qatar became the first Middle East nation to be awarded the rights to host the FIFA World Cup. But, it only took six months for the Gulf nation to be embroiled in a corruption scandal with allegations Qatar 'bought' votes to land the rights to host the World Cup.

Since the allegations, Qatar has been ridiculed for its human rights record, stance on same-sex relationships and treatment of migrant workers.

One of the biggest controversies coming out of Qatar has been the number of reported deaths and the treatment of migrant workers who were hired to help build the stadiums and infrastructure at the World Cup.

Fans will be in tight quarters at the Al-Emadi fan village in Qatar for the FIFA World Cup. (Photo by KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV/AFP via Getty Images)
Fans will be in tight quarters at the Al-Emadi fan village in Qatar for the FIFA World Cup. (Photo by KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV/AFP via Getty Images)

In 2019, the UN released a report calling for further safeguards to help protect workers from working in the extreme humidity and heat in order to make sure the stadiums were ready.

In 2020, the Human Rights Watch released a report that claimed migrant workers were having their wages withheld during their time in Qatar.

A Guardian report in 2021 claimed more than 6,500 migrant workers had died in Qatar since the beginning of preparations fro the 2022 World Cup.

The nation has fervently hit back at the reports, but the issue over worker safety and treatment has been a major issue leading into this year's tournament.

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