FIFA World Cup 2022: The good, bad and ugly side of Qatar showpiece

The 2022 FIFA World Cup is set to enter a new frontier, with Qatar being given the honour of becoming the first nation from the Middle East to host the global football showpiece. However, it’s also shone a spotlight on the country’s human rights record, and disturbing reports about the number of workers who’ve died making it happen. Let’s look at the good, the bad and the ugly of the 2022 FIFA World Cup.

Video transcript

- The 2022 FIFA World Cup is set to enter a new frontier, with Qatar being given the honor of becoming the first nation from the Middle East to host the global football showpiece. However, it's also put a spotlight on the country's human rights record and disturbing reports about the number of workers who've died making it happen. Let's take a look at the good, the bad, and the ugly of the 2022 FIFA World Cup.

[MUSIC PLAYING]

In what is set to be a landmark moment for sport in the region the Qatar showpiece represents the first time a FIFA World Cup has been held in the Middle East. Qatar organizers have described it as a "unique and special" event for the country and one which will leave a "profound legacy for Qatar, the region and the entire world."

[MUSIC PLAYING]

Due to the searing temperatures in Qatar, for the first time ever, the World Cup is being held in November and December instead of June and July, bringing about a range of issues. Domestic competitions around the world are being forced to go on hold for around six weeks, with club games happening right up until almost one week before the World Cup kicks off on November 21. As well as the logistical nightmare for clubs, the timing of the World Cup is also a serious issue for the growing list of players picking up injuries in the lead-up.

[MUSIC PLAYING]

The World Cup in Qatar has been plagued by numerous controversies, including the country's treatment of migrant workers, its human rights record, and stance on homosexuality. Amnesty International has reported that since 2010, hundreds of thousands of migrant workers have faced human rights abuses while employed to build infrastructure for the tournament. A "Guardian" report in 2021 claimed more than 6,500 migrant workers had died working on the sites in Qatar, despite local officials disputing those numbers. Qatar has also been slammed for its criminalization of homosexuality, with teams around the world, including the Socceroos, speaking out in support of LGBTQIA+ rights.

[MUSIC PLAYING]