'Doesn't matter': New Zealand bowler's fury over catch controversy

Chris Young
·Sports Reporter
·4-min read
New Zealand's Kyle Jamieson had this caught and bowled overturned, after the ball hit the ground first as he fell to the turf. Pictures: Spark Sports
New Zealand's Kyle Jamieson had this caught and bowled overturned, after the ball hit the ground first as he fell to the turf. Pictures: Spark Sports

New Zealand quick Kyle Jamieson's dismissal of Bangladesh's Tamim Iqbal looked every bit like a regulation caught and bowled during the second of their three-game ODI series.

The Kiwi paceman showed off a sharp reaction time when Iqbal batted a straight drive back at him on the full, catching it in his left hand and tumbling to the pitch as the momentum from his delivery carried him forward.

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Jamieson seemed to have held onto it though but the umpire wasn't quit sure, sending it up to the third umpire but giving a preliminary decision of out.

On replay, Jamieson's hands could be seen on top of the ball, rather than cupped beneath it as he fell to the ground, with the ball coming into contact with the turf.

Despite it looking to be a straightforward catch, third umpire Chris Gaffaney felt the decision was clear.

“I’ve got the ball on the ground, and the player is not fully in control,” he said.

Jamieson was furious as the decision was changed to not out, appearing to say 'f***ing bulls***' as he walked back to his fielding position at the end of the over.

While the replay caused controversy online, many pointed out that, as per the rules of the game, it was the correct call.

Rule 33.3 'Making a Catch' states the player must be in control of the ball and their body for the catch to be made.

"The act of making a catch shall start from the time when the ball first comes into contact with a fielder’s person and shall end when a fielder obtains complete control over both the ball and his/her own movement," the rule reads.

The decision generated plenty of interest online.

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In a further blow for Jamieson, Iqbal went on to add another 40 runs to his total, eventually dismissed for 78.

Bangladesh set New Zealand a total of 271 to win the second match of the three-game series. New Zealand won the series opener.

Queensland's big wet washes out Shield play

Play has been abandoned without a ball being bowled on the opening day of the Sheffield Shield clash between Queensland and South Australia in Brisbane.

With heavy rainfall continuing to lash Queensland's south-east, umpires made the decision to call off the day early on Tuesday at Ian Healy Oval.

The game had been moved to the revamped suburban oval due to concerns over the drainage at Allan Border Field with Brisbane lashed by days of persistent rain.

Queensland's Sheffield Shield clash with South Australia has been abandoned before play even began. (Photo by Jono Searle/Getty Images)
Queensland's Sheffield Shield clash with South Australia has been abandoned before play even began. (Photo by Jono Searle/Getty Images)

It comes after just 76 overs were possible in last week's match between the Bulls and Victoria due to wet weather.

Conditions are forecast to improve overnight, raising hopes the match will be able to resume at some point on Wednesday.

Top-placed Queensland will almost certainly secure hosting rights for this year's final if they can win either of their remaining matches against the Redbacks or NSW.

South Australia come into the match last and are attempting to avoid a fourth consecutive wooden spoon, with Tasmania's win over the Blues leaving Jason Gillespie's team 10 points adrift of fifth-placed Victoria.

With AAP

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