Andrew Symonds' devastating post about Shane Warne before death

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Andrew Symonds and Shane Warne, pictured here during their playing days.
Andrew Symonds and Shane Warne have died within months of each other. Image: Instagram

The Australian cricket community is dealing with more devastating news after the tragic death of Andrew Symonds in a car accident on Saturday night.

The 46-year-old former all-rounder was killed in a single-vehicle crash late on Saturday near Townsville.

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Police said they are investigating the crash, which occurred at Hervey Range where Symonds lived.

"Early information indicates, shortly after 11pm the car was being driven on Hervey Range Road, near Alice River Bridge when it left the roadway and rolled," Queensland Police said in a statement.

"Emergency services attempted to revive the 46-year-old driver and sole occupant, however, he died of his injuries."

Symonds' death marks the third tragedy for Australian cricket in recent months, with Shane Warne and Rod Marsh dying within 24 hours of each other in March.

Warne and Marsh both suffered heart attacks, leaving the Australian cricket community reeling.

Symonds was among the thousands to express their shock at the time.

The 46-year-old posted a number of photos of himself and Warne on social media at the time, writing: "Devastated, I’m hoping this is all a bad dream.

"I just can’t get my head around never seeing you again.

"Love to all the Warne family. I’m speechless."

It was the last post Symonds ever made.

Symonds was also present at the state memorial service for Warne at the MCG last month.

In a cruel twist of fate, it is now Symonds who is being mourned.

The Queenslander is survived by wife Laura and children Chloe and Billy.

According to News Corp, Symonds' family released a statement "confirming his passing, and appreciated peoples' sympathy and best wishes, and asked that their privacy be respected".

Andrew Symonds, pictured here at the state memorial service for Shane Warne at the MCG.
Andrew Symonds at the state memorial service for Shane Warne at the MCG. (Photo by Darrian Traynor/Getty Images)

An explosive right-hand batter and handy spin and seam bowler, Symonds played 198 one-day internationals for Australia, as well as 26 Tests and 14 Twenty20 internationals.

He scored 5088 runs at ODI level at an average of 39.75, while also taking 133 wickets.

He was a key member of Australia's dominant ODI team that won back-to-back World Cups in 2003 and 2007.

At Test level he scored 1462 runs at 40.61, while also snaring 24 wickets.

In recent years he worked as a TV commentator for Fox Sports and was a regular on the microphone for Big Bash League broadcasts.

Michael Clarke and Andrew Symonds, pictured here chairing Shane Warne around the SCG after Australia's Ashes triumph in 2007.
Michael Clarke (L) and Andrew Symonds (R) chair Shane Warne around the SCG after Australia's Ashes triumph in 2007. (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)

Cricket world in shock over Andrew Symonds tragedy

A number of former teammates and Australia captains have expressed their shock over Symonds death.

Adam Gilchrist tweeted "this really hurts", while Jason Gillespie wrote: "Horrendous news to wake up to. Utterly devastated. We are all gonna miss you mate."

Mark Taylor told Channel Nine: "Unfortunately I've been here too often this year under these circumstances.

"I actually can't quite believe it, to be honest. Another tragic day for cricket."

Allan Border said: "He hit the ball a long way and just wanted to entertain. He was, in a way, a little bit of an old-fashioned cricketer.

"He was an adventurer. Loved his fishing, he loved hiking, camping.

"People liked his very laid-back style.

"He lived in Townsville. When I spoke to him, I think he still had a hundred head of cattle he used to muster.

"Symo away from the cameras and away from the spotlight, loved, I think, a bit of solitude and that is why he loved his fishing. Loved his own time."

with AAP

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