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Caitlin Clark's potential record-breaking game vs. Nebraska sees soaring ticket prices

Clark is 65 points behind Kelsey Plum's Division I women's scoring record

Pinnacle Bank Arena is sold out for Sunday's Iowa-Nebraska game which is sending fans who want to witness history to secondary ticket markets. (Photo by G Fiume/Getty Images)
Pinnacle Bank Arena is sold out for Sunday's Iowa-Nebraska game which is sending fans who want to witness history to secondary ticket markets. (Photo by G Fiume/Getty Images) (G Fiume via Getty Images)

Caitlin Clark is quickly approaching the NCAA Division I women's scoring record and there's a chance she passes Kelsey Plum on Sunday when Iowa visits Nebraska.

Clark is averaging 32.4 points per game for the No. 2-ranked Hawkeyes and she is currently at 3,462 career points, 65 behind Plum's 3,527. Iowa hosts Penn State on Thursday, so we will know exactly how many point she needs to break the record in Sunday's game against Nebraska.

The possibility of seeing history is causing Cornhuskers fans to seek out tickets, which means heading to secondary markets since Pinnacle Bank Arena is sold out. Because of that, prices are spiking in anticipation.

Ticketmaster: The cheapest general admission seat will run you $107 as of Wednesday morning, while a 20th row seat in the lower bowl will cost you $612.

SeatGeek: It will take $85 for a general admission seat and $740 for one in the 22nd row.

StubHub: General admission is just under $100, but there are several listings in the thousands, with the highest coming in at $2,215 for a spot near center court.

(prices before fees)

In comparison, you can get tickets to Nebraska's first home game after Iowa on Feb. 20 against Northwestern for $10 or $15.

The Caitlin Clark Effect has driven not only ticket sales but also television ratings. Saturday's 93-85 win over Maryland drew 1.6 million viewers on Fox, making it the most-watched women’s basketball game in the network’s history. That number also made Iowa's regular-season win the second-most viewed women's college basketball game on any network since 2010, according to Sports Media Watch.

“It’s honestly hard for me to wrap my head around. It’s crazy, it’s crazy the way people scream my name and really support us and I try to make time for as many of them as I can,” Clark said of the attention. “Like, whenever I walk off the court, it’s so special just the way people scream our names and are so excited for our team. And that’s something that never gets old. I was that kid a few years back, so it’s crazy how time flies and I just try to soak it all in, every single moment.”