Bryson DeChambeau and Brooks Koepka take ugly feud to US Open

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·Sports Reporter
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Brroks Koepka and Bryson DeChambeau's feud is showing no signs of slowing heading into the US Open. Pictures: Getty Images
Brroks Koepka and Bryson DeChambeau's feud is showing no signs of slowing heading into the US Open. Pictures: Getty Images

Brooks Koepka and Bryson DeChambeau look set to continue the US Open's seemingly long-running tradition of top contenders feuding in the lead-up to the tournament.

Much like Phil Mickelson and Tiger Woods, or Jordan Speith and Patrick Reid, Koepka and DeChambeau enter the US Open not exactly seeing eye to eye.

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The dislike between the pair was on show for all to see when Koepka appeared visibly frustrated at the sight of DeChambeau during a recent television interview.

Even Spieth has joked that the sight of the pair hugging it out would seem like a long shot - so perhaps it's for the best the tee times will see them on opposite sides of the course.

Koepka, the 2017 and 2018 champion, left little to the imagination when talking about their relationship.

"I don't know if I'd call it a conflict," Koepka said.

"We don't like each other. There's plenty of people you guys don't like. I don't see any difference."

This goes back nearly two years and has only intensified recently.

The US Open starts on Thursday (early Friday AEST), and both players will have enough concerns coping with a South Course with dense, punishing rough that looks to fit the bill as the toughest test in golf.

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"It doesn't matter to me what goes on," Koepka said.

"It makes no difference to me. I'm out there trying to play my own game. What happens inside the ropes, it won't bother me."

DeChambeau described it as "great banter."

"I hope on the weekend we can play against each other and compete," DeChambeau said.

"I think it would be fun and would be great for the game."

Personal rivalries add intrigue to US Open

For an individual sport with so many personalities, it should not be surprising that not everyone gets along.

"I think they've got a rivalry now, and I think it's good for the game in the sense of rivals," 2012 US Open champion Webb Simpson said.

Simpson even wondered if they were doing this on purpose to improve their reach with fans, tapping into a $40 million ($A52 million) bonus pool based on player engagement.

Brooks Koepka has made no secret of his dislike for rival Bryson DeChambeau. (Photo by Vivien Killilea/Getty Images for SiriusXM)
Brooks Koepka has made no secret of his dislike for rival Bryson DeChambeau. (Photo by Vivien Killilea/Getty Images for SiriusXM)

"It would be fun to see them duel it out in a tournament here coming up, head-to-head on Sunday," he said.

Most other players have more pressing concerns, starting with how to keep the ball on the fairways and on the greens to avoid the rough.

Spieth stepped awkwardly last week and has been dealing with soreness in his foot, hopeful that daily improvements will have him at full strength by Thursday.

World No.2 Jon Rahm feels a little behind from a week without any practice after testing positive for coronavirus at the Memorial and having to self isolate.

With AAP

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