Deontay Wilder's brilliant response to KO that shook the world

Deontay Wilder's stunning KO victory over Luis Ortiz in Las Vegas showed again why he's considered one of hardest hitters boxing has ever seen.

Incredibly, the trainer of his biggest rival, Tyson Fury, is adamant the American is the most powerful puncher in the history of the sport.

“He’s the biggest puncher not just in heavyweight history, but in boxing history," Ben Davison said when asked where Wilder sits among the sport's greats.

It's a massive statement that Mike Tyson fans would no doubt dispute.

What can't be disputed is the unrivalled punching power Wilder possesses over his current fellow heavyweights.

The fact was illustrated perfectly by the stunning seventh round knockout of Ortiz that left the boxing world in awe.

Many good judges had Wilder losing all six rounds prior to the punch that left his opponent unable to continue.

Deontay Wilder caught Luis Ortiz with a massive right hand that ended the fight. Pic: AAP

The extraordinary turnaround was summed up perfectly by Wilder after the fight, when he put his brutal punching power into perspective.

“They have to be perfect for 12 rounds, I only have to be perfect for two seconds," Wilder confidently stated.

Ortiz had boxed as close to perfection as he could have hoped but unfortunately for the Cuban veteran, he suffered the same fate as the majority of opponents unlucky enough to catch one of Wilder's massive right hand shots.

The 34-year-old Wilder remains on course to achieve his goal of unifying all four heavyweight belts despite being largely outboxed by Ortiz

Unbeaten in 43 fights, Wilder showed why he is widely regarded as the most destructive puncher in the resurgent heavyweight division.

The "Bronze Bomber" recorded his 10th straight title defence to equal Muhammad Ali who achieved the feat between 1974 and 1978. Only four heavyweights in the history of boxing have made more than 10 consecutive title defences.

Wilder waited patiently for his big moment and when it came, with just nine seconds left in the round, it was stunning.

He followed a pawing jab with a crushing straight right that sent Ortiz's head snapping back and his body crashing into the ropes before landing on the canvas.

Deontay Wilder retained his heavyweight title after the stunning seventh round KO. Pic: AAP

"That was a punch intended to hurt for sure," said the American. "I got him at the right angle, my feet were planted perfectly and I felt the torque."

Ortiz tried to get up but he clearly could not continue. The fight was officially stopped at 2:51 of the seventh.

Unification goal

It was a repeat of their 2018 fight where Wilder had battled adversity to deliver a 10th-round stoppage.

Wilder's win now sets up another money-spinning rematch with Tyson Fury scheduled for February.

“Next, of course, we have the rematch with Tyson Fury,” he said.

If he comes through that a unification showdown against the winner of next month's rematch between Anthony Joshua and Andy Ruiz in Saudi Arabia for the other three major heavyweight belts could follow.

“The schedule is set to be done in February so we will see how that goes. After that, I’m looking for a unification bout. I want one champion, one face and one name and he go by the name of Deontay Wilder.

The fights with Fury, and Ruiz or Joshua, would generate millions for Wilder.

The last two years in heavyweight boxing have provided plenty of rousing match-ups and renewed enthusiasm in contrast to the previous 15 years or so which were dominated by the Klitschko brothers.

"The heavyweight division is too small to have so many belts lingering around. It should be just be one champion and I think I am the perfect man for that job." Wilder added.

The 40-year-old Ortiz, who was coming off three straight victories, was trying to become the first Cuban to win the world heavyweight title.

"This is boxing. I told everyone it wasn't going to go 12 rounds," said Ortiz.

Ortiz won most of the early rounds. He was the aggressor from the opening bell as he tagged Wilder with a left hook to the face in the opening round.

Ortiz also suffered a cut to his right temple area in the opening round due to an accidental clash of heads. But there was little blood flow and his corner did a good job of containing it as the rounds continued.

Both fighters were waiting for an opening in the second round and by the third Ortiz was building up points because he was the busier of the two.

Ortiz landed a big overhand shot in the fourth which excited the crowd and pumped up Wilder, who pounded his chest and yelled bring it on.

Ortiz's plan to was to fight inside and pay attention to defence while Wilder was constantly looking for the knockout shot and hoping Ortiz would eventually tire himself out.

That transpired in the seventh as Ortiz walked straight into a punch that appeared to come out of nowhere, sending the Cuban into dreamland.

"I tell people all the time my intellect is very high in the ring so I know exactly what I'm doing," Wilder told Sky Sports.

"I had to calculate Ortiz perfectly, he's very dangerous in that ring as you can see, that's why no other heavyweight wanted to give him the opportunity. He's very smart.

"Once I got him I set him up and that was the shot. I always say these guys have to be perfect for 12 rounds, I only have to be perfect for two seconds and each and every time I've proved that.

"Tyson Fury is definitely next and then after that I want a unification bout with whoever wins between (Anthony) Joshua and (Andy) Ruiz Jr.

"Right now we're ready for Tyson Fury. Hopefully he's ready for me, I know his trainer's here so I hope he got some notes down. I'm ready to go at any give time and any given moment and February is looking like our time."

With agencies