'Be braver': Olympic swimmer Emily Seebohm's hidden two-year battle

Chris Young
·Sports Reporter
·2-min read
Australian Olympic swimmer Emily Seebohm has opened up about her two-year-battle with an eating disorder. Pictures: Instagram/Getty Images
Australian Olympic swimmer Emily Seebohm has opened up about her two-year-battle with an eating disorder. Pictures: Instagram/Getty Images

Australian Olympic swimmer Emily Seebohm has taken to social media to reveal a two-year battle with an eating disorder.

The 28-year-old, who represented Australia at the 2008, 2012 and 2016 Olympics, took to Instagram to discuss her struggles with her eating disorder.

'AIN’T GOOD ENOUGH': Anthony Mundine rips into anthem change

'HE WAS MY TIGER': Golf great's mistress opens up about affair

Seebohm described enduring a cycle of binge eating and purging, before vowing to ‘give my body the love it deserves’ starting in 2021.

The former world record holder said she had frequently been told the only way her times could improve was by cutting weight.

“For over 2 years I’ve been dealing with an Eating disorder,” Seebohm wrote.

“I’ve binged, purged and taken laxatives. I’ve counted calories, skipped meals and constantly weighted myself. I’ve been embarrassed to be in my togs.

“I have judged my body every time I have been in front of a mirror.

“I’ve been told that the only way I can swim faster is by losing weight and I have believed it.

“This year I’m going to be braver for myself. To give my body the love it deserves and to start I needed to be honest to everyone including myself.

“I’m not asking for anything but hoping that I can help someone who could be feeling the same.”

Olympic star Emily Seebohm reveals eating disorder battle

Seebohm received plenty of support after revealing what she had been going through, including from fellow Australian swimmer Brittany Elmslie.

“It sure isn’t easy. Always here, always proud,” Elmslie wrote on the comments.

Radio presenter and former reality show star Abby Coleman also showed support for Brisbane-based Seebohm in her own comment.

“It’s so hard to admit it. Proud you have,” Coleman wrote.

“I used to feel like it would be something I could never ever recover from but anyone going through it complete recovery is possible.”

Seebohm is continuing to prepare for the postponed Tokyo Olympics, where she will likely be one of the favourites in the 100m backstroke.

She currently holds the Australian record in both the 100m and 200m backstroke.

Click here to sign up to our newsletter for all the latest and breaking stories from Australia and around the world.