'Losing his mind': Nick Kyrgios complaint mocked by Aus Open fans

Nick Kyrgios' complaints about noise from the Australian Open crowd have been met with a degree of bemusement by tennis fans, after his frequent calls for more noise from fans. (Photo by Darrian Traynor/Getty Images)
Nick Kyrgios' complaints about noise from the Australian Open crowd have been met with a degree of bemusement by tennis fans, after his frequent calls for more noise from fans. (Photo by Darrian Traynor/Getty Images)

Nick Kyrgios and Thanasi Kokkinakis have powered through to the mens doubles final at the Australian Open, but in typical style, it hasn't come without controversy.

The pair claimed a straight sets win in front of a vocal but slightly more restrained crowd on Rod Laver Arena compared to the festival-like atmosphere for their earlier matches to tee up a final showdown against fellow Aussie duo Max Purcell and Matthew Ebden.

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The behaviour of the crowd during their matches, as well as several other singles fixtures, has been a point of contention throughout the Australian Open as Kyrgios frequently implored fans for more noise in his earlier matchups.

His bids for a more intense atmosphere might have been too successful though, with Kyrgios ironically making the same complaints about noises during his second serve that several of his opponents have made throughout the Open.

A frustrated Kyrgios had his serve broken to bring the second set of their match against Horacio Zeballos and Marcel Granollers back to 4-3, after the Aussies secured an early break.

After angrily tossing a ball at the back wall, Kyrgios smashed he racquet after giving up break point soon after, earning a code violation for his troubles.

Courtside microphones picked up Kyrgios furiously demanding the chair umpire act on noise from the crowd.

“How many times? How many times will it happen before you do something?" he asked.

"The ball gets thrown up and they go again and again and again and again, four times."

Fans however, were short on sympathy for the bombastic Kyrgios, noting he'd had few issues with it when it had affected his opponents.

Kyrgios didn't get much sympathy from Channel 9's commentary team either, with Todd Woodbridge describing his complaints as 'contradictory', while fellow commentator Sam Groth was a little more to the point.

“Kyrgios unhappy with the crowd yelling between serves. Not very different to what we have been hearing all week, to be honest," he said.

“Maybe it is acceptable on Kia Arena and not Rod Laver Arena.”

Kyrgios, Kokkinakis into all-Aussie doubles final

The Special Ks' semi-final was promoted to Rod Laver Arena after their giant-killing run on outside courts.

And the home hopes did not disappoint on centre stage.

Kyrgios and Kokkinakis outlasted third seeds Marcel Granollers and Horacio Zeballos 7-6 (7-4) 6-4 in an hour and 47 minutes on Thursday.

The victory sets up an all-Australian final at the Australian Open for the first time since 1980 with Matt Ebden and Max Purcell taking down second seeds Rajeev Ram and Joe Salisbury 6-3 7-6 (11-9) in their semi-final.

Showing more focus and restraint than in previous matches on the raucous outside courts, the pair mostly let their irresistible tennis do the talking.

Kyrgios believed the atmosphere and the combination with great mate Kokkinakis had brought out his best, allowing them to stun established doubles partnerships.

Nick Kyrgios and Thanasi Kokkinakis will face Max Purcell and Matt Ebden in the first all-Australian mens doubles final at the Australian Open in 42 years. (Photo by BRANDON MALONE/AFP via Getty Images)
Nick Kyrgios and Thanasi Kokkinakis will face Max Purcell and Matt Ebden in the first all-Australian mens doubles final at the Australian Open in 42 years. (Photo by BRANDON MALONE/AFP via Getty Images)

"I think I've played pretty good tennis in the past," Kyrgios said.

"I've beaten pretty much every player that's picked up a racquet.

"I've obviously had to play a certain level of tennis.

"It's not like I'm going out there putting on a clown suit and creating a circus.

"I have also won big titles, and played the traditional way.

"I think now I'm able to channel a different fanbase."

The great Rod Laver, who only turns up for big matches on the court that is named in his honour, watched on from the front row, as did legendary Australian cricket captain Steve Waugh.

With AAP

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