Australian Open provides update after 'terrible' ball kid collapse

Sam Goodwin
·Sports Editor
·2-min read
The ball girl collapsed on court at the Australian Open on Tuesday morning. Image: Eurosport
The ball girl collapsed on court at the Australian Open on Tuesday morning. Image: Eurosport

There were scary scenes at the Australian Open on Tuesday morning when a young ball girl collapsed on court and had to taken away for medical attention.

The young girl was in action during the match on Court 16 between Lloyd Harris and Mikael Torpegaard when he suddenly collapsed.

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Both players as well as on-court officials rushed to her aid, before she was helped off the court.

Spanish tennis writer Jose Morgado first broke the news on Twitter, describing it as a “terrible situation”.

A Tennis Australia spokesperson later said the young girl was “unwell”.

“A ball kid was unwell during the first match on Court 16 today,” the TA spokesperson told Channel 7.

“She was immediately attended to by the medical team and will rest at home as a precautionary measure.

“She will return to her ball kid duties later this week."

Fans were quick to send their best wishes to the youngster, while players were said to be shaken up by the incident.

The temperature was around 22C at Melbourne Park at midday on Tuesday, with the mercury expected to hit 27C.

Fans taking cautious approach to Australian Open

Tuesday’s action at Melbourne Park kicked off with hardly any spectators in the stands for the second day running.

The total crowd on the first day of the Australian Open hit just 17,922, including day and night sessions in three divided zones.

It was well down on the 64,387 fans that crammed onto the grounds on the opening day of last year’s championship, but way more than any other grand slam held since then.

The state government is allowing up to 30,000 people per day into Melbourne Park for the Australian Open, which is less than 50% of capacity.

The precautions are in place to provide some social-distancing because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Quiet start in the crowd for the Australian Open,” Channel 7’s Nick McCallum wrote alongside a photo of a smattering of fans on Monday.

“Those here are excited and feel they are in one of the safest areas in Melbourne.

“But ticket sales are slow for day one.”

There were no fans allowed at the US Open, only about 1000 per day were allowed at Roland Garros and Wimbledon was cancelled.

with AAP

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