What is Ash Barty's net worth? How much prize money has she won?

Sam Goodwin
Sports Editor

Ash Barty’s meteoric rise to the top of women’s tennis has had an incredible affect on her bank account.

She has the World No.1 ranking, a French Open title, plus universal love and respect.

But she also has career prize money of almost $24 million - the majority of which came last year alone.

Barty was the WTA tour’s richest performer in 2019 after crashing through the $10 million prize money barrier for the season.

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The unprecedented windfall for an Australian player in a single season more than doubled her entire career earnings.

The Australian claimed a record-setting $6.4 million million paycheque by winning the season-ending WTA Finals.

It was the largest sum ever awarded in men's and women's tennis.

Thanks for coming.

Ash Barty won her maiden grand slam at the French Open in 2019. (Photo by Tim Clayton/Corbis via Getty Images)

But Barty is staying grounded

But Barty doesn't feel complete - she doesn't even consider herself the complete package as a player.

"I want to be the complete tennis player," she told reporters ahead of the Adelaide International.

"... The challenge is now to continue to try and improve as a tennis player and that's all I can really ask of myself.

"It's going to be small improvements but improvements nonetheless every single day."

Barty will carry top billing - and expectation and adulation of her sports-besotted nation - into the Australian Open in Melbourne.

But Barty has promised, to herself and her fans, that carrying the world No.1 ranking won't change her.

"Regardless of what number is next to my name - and whether it's one, two, 10, 20, 50 - it's not going to make me any more or less hungry to try and be the best that I can be," she said.

Ash Barty addresses the media at the Adelaide International. (Photo by Paul Kane/Getty Images)

"That is what we're striving for every single day, to try and improve every single day and try and bring the best out of myself.

"And I have an exceptional team of people around me that help me do that and that is all we worry about - there certainly won't be any stresses about whatever number is there.

"Having a number next to your name doesn't guarantee anything - it doesn't guarantee wins.

"You still have to go out there and do the work ... and do your best every single match.

"And that is how I'm going to approach this week here in Adelaide; that is how I'm going to approach the Australian Open.

"That is how I'm going to try and approach the rest of my career, regardless of what number is next to my name."

No pressure at home grand slam

As for the pressure sure to come from an Australian public to deliver an Australian Open fairytale title?

"No more pressure - we're not there yet," she said.

"It's something I don't need to worry about this week. I'm here to play in Adelaide and try to do the best that I can.

"And once we get to Melbourne, we will prepare like we do for any other grand slam.

"There's no more pressure, certainly from my team or myself ... it's not really something that I worry about."

with AAP