'What a disaster': Aussies savaged over 'embarrassing' cricket farce

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·Sports Editor
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Dan Christian and Ashton Agar, pictured here at the same end.
Dan Christian and Ashton Agar were involved in a horrible runout. Image: Fox Cricket

Australia have suffered a second embarrassing T20 loss to the West Indies in 24 hours, losing by 56 runs in St Lucia on Saturday night.

The Aussies suffered a horrific batting collapse to lose the first T20 on Friday, and it wasn't much better on Saturday.

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Chasing a formidable total of 197 for victory, the Aussies were bowled out for 140 with four balls to spare.

The embarrassing display was epitomised by the farcical runout of Ashton Agar in which he and Dan Christian ended up at the same end.

Christian called Agar through for a quick single but was turned down by his batting partner, but Christian kept running to Agar's horror.

There were embarrassing scenes as Christian and Agar had to wait for the third umpire to decide which batsman had to leave the field.

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West Indies take 2-0 lead in T20 series

Australia now face a monumental challenge to win the five-match series after West Indies took a 2-0 lead.

Sent in to bat for the second time in as many matches, the hosts made 4-196 in an innings which contained 13 sixes and just eight fours.

A fourth-wicket partnership of 103 off 65 balls between Shimron Hetmyer (61 off 36 balls) and Dwayne Bravo (47 not out off 34) provided the substance.

Left-hander Hetmyer reached his 50 off 29 balls with an audacious scoop for six over the wicketkeeper's head off paceman Mitchell Starc, who leaked 49 off his four overs.

Hayden Walsh Jr, pictured here after the dismissal of Moises Henriques in the second T20 between Australia and West Indies.
Hayden Walsh Jr celebrates the dismissal of Moises Henriques in the second T20 between Australia and West Indies. (Photo by RANDY BROOKS/AFP via Getty Images)

Veteran Bravo, who batted three places higher than in the series opener on Friday, was dropped on 15 by Christian at long off and made the Australians pay.

Andre Russell, who clobbered a maiden T20 international half century in the first game, produced a trademark, late-innings cameo with 24 off eight balls.

Agar (1-28 off four) was the most economical of the Australian bowlers who completed a full quota, with each of the other five conceding at least nine an over.

Paceman Josh Hazlewood, who conceded just 12 runs in his four overs in game one, went for 14 in his second over and 40 in total.

Lendl Simmons (31 off 21 balls) smacked three sixes before cutting a ball from Hazlewood into the gloves of wicketkeeper Matthew Wade.

The recent lean streak of renowned power hitter Chris Gayle (13 off 16) continued as he dragged a Mitchell Marsh delivery into his stumps.

with AAP

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