Novak Djokovic sends brutal message to Roger Federer at Wimbledon

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·Sports Editor
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Novak Djokovic is coming for Roger Federer's record at Wimbledon. Image: Wimbledon/Getty
Novak Djokovic is coming for Roger Federer's record at Wimbledon. Image: Wimbledon/Getty

Novak Djokovic has put Roger Federer on notice that he's coming for his grand slam record after a brutal straight-sets victory at Wimbledon on Wednesday.

The World No.1 has begun Wimbledon like a man on a mission as he eyes off a number of slices of tennis history.

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The 34-year-old described his 6-3 6-3 6-3 second-round win over twice grand slam runner-up Kevin Anderson as "almost flawless" and no one on Centre Court would disagree.

Djokovic made just five unforced errors in a masterful display against the South African he also beat in the 2018 final.

And while he did lose the first set of his opening round match against inspired British teenager Jack Draper, what has followed has been an ominous statement of intent.

Djokovic is not only chasing a sixth Wimbledon title and third in a row, he can also match Federer and Rafa Nadal's men's record haul of 20 grand slam titles.

And if that's not enough, he is also halfway to the calendar-year sweep of all four majors - last achieved by Rod Laver in 1969.

If he wins Wimbledon, Djokovic can also compete for the 'Golden Slam' of winning all four majors and an Olympic gold medal.

By the end of the year Djokovic might have well and truly settled the GOAT (greatest of all-time) debate.

Novak Djokovic, pictured here after his win over Kevin Anderson at Wimbledon.
Novak Djokovic celebrates his win over Kevin Anderson at Wimbledon. (Photo by Steven Paston/PA Images via Getty Images)

Novak Djokovic vows to learn from 2016 failures

Djokovic was eyeing the same sort of history in 2016 having also arrived at Wimbledon as a hot favourite after winning the Australian and French Open titles.

Then, at Wimbledon, he was stunned by American Sam Querrey in the third round.

So Djokovic will certainly not be letting his guard slip when he plays American Denis Kudla on Friday.

Looking back to 2016, Djokovic said he had come in feeling a little deflated after the high of winning his first French Open.

"I'm going to try to learn from that experience that I had in 2016," Djokovic, bidding to become the fifth man in history to win the first three grand slam tournaments of the season since Laver in 1969, told reporters.

"This time I'm probably, I would like to think, a bit wiser and a bit more experienced as a player and person. But it's only two matches into the tournament, there's still a long way to go."

Anderson, on the comeback trail after knee injuries, played high-level tennis but Djokovic broke serve with ease once in each set for a clean cut victory.

"I've done things on and off the court to make myself feel that I'm focused, yet at the same time calm and composed and clear with my game plan," he said.

with Reuters

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