Serena Williams reveals secret behind Roger Federer's career

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·Sports Reporter
·3-min read
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Serena Williams (pictured left) has revealed why she thinks Roger Federer (pictured right) and herself have been able to sustain their success into their late 30s. (Getty Images)
Serena Williams (pictured left) has revealed why she thinks Roger Federer (pictured right) and herself have been able to sustain their success into their late 30s. (Getty Images)

Serena Williams has revealed the secret to why she thinks Roger Federer and herself have been able to sustain their prolonged success at the top of tennis.

Both Williams and Federer are seeded No.6 at Wimbledon, despite their ages of 39.

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Williams is looking to equal Margaret Court's record of 24 Grand Slam titles, while Federer is looking to become the first men's player to reach 21 titles.

The American will favour her odds at Wimbledon having a remarkable 98-12 record on grass and having won SW19 seven times.

She last won it in 2016.

Federer has won the prestigious tournament eight times, but his last victory was 2017.

Both tennis superstars will be turning 40 before next year, which highlights the remarkable ability of both to maintain their tilt at the top of their respective games.

And in a Wimbledon press conference, Williams provided one of the reasons why the pair are still able to dominate late into their 30s.

“Well, I feel like, people can still say they can play longer. Technology has played a huge role in that," she said of the pair.

"The way we view the game, the way we recover, the way our shoes are made, the way our equipment is made, I feel like technology is huge in to myself and Roger playing so long."

Serena Williams (pictured left) and Roger Federer (pictured right) take a selfie.
Serena Williams (pictured left) and Roger Federer (pictured right) take a selfie following their mixed doubles match during day four of the 2019 Hopman Cup at RAC Arena on January 01, 2019 in Perth, Australia. (Photo by Paul Kane/Getty Images)

In decades past, athletes would be considered in their twilight in their early 30s.

Williams went on to explain the difference now, compared to a few years ago.

“Normally, people retire at 29,30, 32 max. So I feel like there are several players at that age who are hitting their stride," she added.

"So, whether it was myself or whether it was Roger, I think it was a combination of everything including technology."

Williams faces a tough run if she is to win Wimbledon, having been drawn on the same side as World No.1 Ash Barty, Angelique Kerber and Victoria Azarenka.

Serena Williams' sad Olympics announcement

The 23-time grand slam champion announced the news at her pre-tournament press conference on Sunday without giving the reasons behind her decision.

"Yeah, I'm actually not on the Olympic list, so... Not that I'm aware of. If so, then I shouldn't be on it," Williams told reporters on the eve of Wimbledon.

The American, who will turn 40 in September, won singles gold at the London Olympics in 2012 and has also won three gold medals in doubles with sister Venus — in Sydney (2000), Beijing (2008) and London.

Watch 'Mind Games', the new series from Yahoo Sport Australia exploring the often brutal mental toil elite athletes go through in pursuit of greatness:

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