Teen Walsh may remain Warriors fullback

·2-min read

While it looked like a baptism of fire, Warriors coach Nathan Brown felt an Anzac Day clash at AAMI Park against a red-hot Melbourne was the "perfect time" for teen Reece Walsh's NRL debut.

The 18-year-old, who only joined the Warriors from Brisbane two weeks ago, had his first start on Sunday night, bumping superstar Roger Tuivasa-Sheck out of fullback in the 42-20 defeat.

After a shaky start, fumbling his first ball, Walsh showed why the Warriors were so eager to accelerate his move from the Broncos.

"You could see Reece's talent," said Brown

"He's got speed and if you look at the better sides, they've got blokes in key positions who are quick - it's a quicker person's game.

"He's got a lot of work to do but any player who has two try assists against Melbourne is good, let alone when you're 18 and on debut."

Brown said that despite it appearing to be a late switch Walsh knew all week he was starting at fullback.

The coach felt it was an ideal time, seemingly conceding that with their heavy injury toll they weren't a genuine chance of beating the Storm at home.

Former schoolboy rugby star Rocco Berry also made his debut in the centres.

"It was the perfect time for my liking," Brown said.

"Most sides will come here with their fittest and best players in and they won't win here and we had a fair number of people not playing so for some of the young blokes to gain experience was great."

While rugby-bound Tuivasa-Sheck defended on the wing, he played at five-eighth and was still heavily involved with 14 runs.

Brown said he would consider pursuing the new combination.

"Obviously where Reece is at physically will play a part but when you look at the second part of the game and got our defence right and started to use the ball, we showed the makings of a football team.

"Preston Campbell won a comp defending on the wing and playing five-eighth for Penrith and Shaun Berrigan won a comp for the Broncos playing at hooker and defending in the centres so recruiters buy good players and coaches have got to try to fit them in the team somewhere.

"We've got to work out a way to get our best players playing and, initially, that looks like it's not a bad way."