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Shiffrin sore but 'relieved' crash injury wasn't worse

AP PHOTO

After one of the scariest crashes of her career, Mikaela Shiffrin is relieved it wasn't worse.

The American skier with a record 95 World Cup wins is "pretty sore," her coach said, but she doesn't appear to have any ligament damage in her left knee following her high-speed spill in a World Cup downhill in Cortina on Friday.

She won't race again this weekend, though, and it's unclear when she'll return.

"She's actually quite good," US team coach Paul Kristofic said after Shiffrin slammed into the safety nets.

"She's positive and in a certain way relieved because it could have been worse. But she's pretty sore, as you are for most speed crashes. But she was quite upbeat about things."

Shiffrin lost control while landing a jump in a patch of soft snow on the upper portion of the Olympia delle Tofane course that will be used for the 2026 Milan-Cortina Olympics.

Medics tended to Shiffrin immediately and she limped off the course with her left boot raised off the snow. She was loaded into a helicopter and taken halfway down the mountain to a landing area before being transported by ambulance to a hospital in Cortina.

"Initial analysis shows the ACL and PCL seem intact," Shiffrin's team said in a statement.

Shiffrin added on social media: "Thank you all for your support."

In an otherwise record-breaking career, Shiffrin also had some high-profile mishaps at the Beijing Olympics two years ago, when she didn't finish three of her five individual races.

"She doesn't fall often," Kristofic said. "But it can happen. It just goes to show you how on the limit athletes push and and how the courses push them. And they have to if they want to be competitive."

There are races every weekend until the season ends in March. So when might she return Kristofic wasn't sure. "We're just going to go day by day at this point and treat what we've got and try to get her back up to speed."

In all, 12 of 52 starters didn't finish the race, which was won by Stephanie Venier of Austria.