Who said what at Wimbledon -- Day 11

  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
·2-min read
Novak Djokovic wll be roaring himself on come Sunday's Wimbledon singles final but he is not so sure he will have the support of the crowd when he plays underdog Matteo Berrettini
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.

Who said what at Wimbledon on Friday, the 11th day of the 2021 tournament at the All England Club:

"I mean, Berrettini, his first time in Grand Slam finals, he's kind of an underdog there. People also like to see someone win who is an underdog or is not maybe expected to win, is not the favourite to win."

-- Novak Djokovic as to whether he will have the majority of the 15,000 crowd on his side as he chases a record-equalling 20th Grand Slam singles title in the final against Matteo Berrettini on Sunday.

"Yes, I'd be very happy if he could be my mentor because that would mean he stopped playing!"

-- Denis Shapovalov on hearing Novak Djokovic had praised the Canadian in giving him a tough match after the Serb won their semi-final in three hard fought sets.

"I don't know. I will tell them to buy a nice TV if they don't have already because I think it's going to be a special Sunday for all of us."

-- Matteo Berrettini on his advice to his fellow Italians ahead of the Wimbledon singles final and the Euro 2020 final later Sunday when Italy play against England.

"I mean, every single service game, he was serving bombs I didn't have many chances, basically probably zero."

-- Hubert Hurkacz on being at the receiving end of semi-final opponent Matteo Berrettini's serves. The Italian won 6-3, 6-0, 6-7 (3/7), 6-4.

"I think it takes a lot to come out and make a statement like that, to say this is what I want to do. I think it's always been on her mind. It's probably on every tennis player's mind that this is the tournament they want to win. But to come out and say it is a big step."

-- Craig Tyzzer coach of women's Wimbledon finalist Ashleigh Barty on her stating a few months ago she wanted to win Wimbledon having been afraid to say so before.

"She was 2-5 down first set (against Tamara Zidansek in 1st rd) and something happened. I saw something change. She got up off the chair, different look in her eyes, like a different player."

-- Sascha Bajin, coach of Barty's opponent in the final Karolina Pliskova, on the moment his natural pessimism disappeared at The Championships and he realised the Czech player was going to do something special -- she came back in that match from 2-5 to win 7-5, 6-4.

afp

Our goal is to create a safe and engaging place for users to connect over interests and passions. In order to improve our community experience, we are temporarily suspending article commenting