Pakistan wants longer Aussie Test series

Scott Bailey
Pakistan captain Azhar Ali wants to play more than two Tests in Australia this summer

Pakistan are lamenting the fact they will only play two Tests in Australia as they become accustomed to facing the harder tracks found Down Under.

This summer's two-Test series between against Pakistan is the first time the two teams haven't met over at least three matches in Australia since 1978-79.

Two-Test series have become far more common in the UAE, where the two teams have played a shortened series on Australia's last two visits.

But there is little doubt teams from the sub-continent struggle to adjust to Australia's extra bounce.

While batters have to cope with far different challenges to the slow and low wickets of the sub-continent, bowlers are far too often enticed to bowl too short.

Opposition teams often get carried away with the conditions, while Pakistan captain Azhar Ali said touring sides had to learn how long it takes to build pressure on Australian wickets.

Regardless, he would prefer his team play longer Test series in the country, after they went 10 months without a red-ball fixture against any nation.

"Obviously we always love to play more Tests," captain Azhar Ali said.

"As the Pakistan team, we don't play too many Tests. That's not good for any team.

"If we play more Tests, we'll have a better chance to even adjust to different conditions.

"The last time we played three Tests here, and if you see our batsmen scored hundreds in all Tests.

"This is one country where you can score big runs. And if you get, here early and get more Tests it will be better."

Pakistan's problems exist well beyond Australia. They have played more than two Tests just twice in the last seven series.

The tourists were convincingly beaten at the Gabba, and made crucial changes for the second Test in Adelaide.

There is a suggestion that by the time players are able to adapt, they are already back on the plane home.

Some of that, in part, is down to the World Test Championship.

Under the competition's rules, series must only be a minimum of two Tests to contribute to the world's standings.

The convoluted calendar also plays a part, with Australia having not returned from the Ashes until late September before a block of Twenty20 games in late October and early November.

Pakistan at least had the advantage of playing three of those, as well as two tour matches.

"I feel that there should be more Tests too," assistant and former fast bowler Waqar Younis said this week.

"Two Tests is very difficult, if you lose one Test it's hard to come back. It should be at least 3 or 4 Tests and of course you need more time to acclimatise."