Azhar Ali world's best at facing pink ball

Scott Bailey
Mohammad Abbas has been recalled to the Pakistan team for the second Test against Australia

Are Australia about to meet their pink ball match in Azhar Ali?

The Pakistan captain, whose day-night record is unmatched by any batsman in the world.

In three Tests, Azhar has hit 456 runs at 91.20.

Granted, 302 of those runs came against the West Indies on a dry pitch in Sharjah in 2016, but it is still an imposing record.

He hit 71 against Australia at the Gabba later in 2016 in a pink-ball match, and also had scores of 59 and 17 in his other day-night Test against Sri Lanka.

"My pink-ball record, I have played three Test matches and I enjoy that," Azhar said.

"You have to apply yourself differently.

"There are different times of the game you have to play differently. There is afternoon, evening and then an hour-and-a-half when the lights are impacting.

"I will look to try and stay on basics again. Hopefully I can perform again like I did in previous Test matches."

Australia have traditionally dominated pink-ball Tests. They are unbeaten in five where Mitchell Starc and Josh Hazlewood have made themselves at home.

Pakistan's 450 against them in Brisbane three summers ago is the only time a team has scored above 260 against the Aussies.

Azhar will move back to the No.3 spot for Friday's Adelaide Test, with Imam-ul-Huq expected to come into the Pakistan side as an opener.

Haris Sohail is then likely to be dropped, after two poor returns in Brisbane.

There is also speculation Babar Azam could move up the order to No.4, although Asad Shafiq's pink-ball record is the third best in the world with 335 runs at 55.83.

"We will announce the side properly (on Friday)," Azhar said.

"We will go with the two openers though and I will come and bat at No.3."

Meanwhile, Pakistan also have threats with the ball.

While Mohammad Abbas is confirmed to return to trouble the Aussies with his movement, legspinner Yasir Shah also shapes as a difficult prospect to pick.

Batsmen traditionally find it hard to read the seam under lights, with Yasir's 18 wickets with the pink ball the most of any spinner in day-night cricket.

In turn, Australia brought up-and-coming leggie Lloyd Pope in to bowl to them in the nets in their main training session on Wednesday night.

"We had a good hit out which was difficult for our batters but by design," Paine said.

"(Lloyd) was awesome. He took a few wickets ... he was hard to pick under lights."