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Oops! Royal Family Mistakenly Shares the Wrong Link to King Charles' Commonwealth Day Speech

The speech was accidentally linked to the personal YouTube account of the Palace's Head of Digital Engagement, Emma Goodey

<p>Chris Jackson/Getty</p> King Charles during a ceremonial welcome at The Arc De Triomphe on September 20, 2023 in Paris, France

Chris Jackson/Getty

King Charles during a ceremonial welcome at The Arc De Triomphe on September 20, 2023 in Paris, France

King Charles' Commonwealth Day celebrations came with a snafu.

Although the King, 75, did not attend the Commonwealth Day service at Westminster Abbey in London on Monday amid his ongoing cancer treatment, he gave a speech that was played for the congregation, which included Queen Camilla, Prince William and other members of the royal family.

A video of his speech was then shared on YouTube, but Gert's Royals noted on X (formerly Twitter) that the royal family's official social media accounts shared the wrong link. Instead of the royals' official YouTube channel, the speech was linked to the personal YouTube account of the Palace's Head of Digital Engagement, Emma Goodey.

Shortly after, the post was removed and replaced with the correct link. The video was also taken down from Goodey's page.

Related: Prince William Steps Out Hours After Kate Middleton's Mother's Day Photo Apology

In his speech, King Charles conveyed a heartfelt message as representatives from 56 Commonwealth nations convened in London.

During his address, he emphasized the significance of the Commonwealth, referring to it as a family of nations, many of which have historical ties to the U.K. through the British Empire. Additionally, Charles holds sovereign status in 14 of these nations, including Canada, Australia and New Zealand.

"I have been most deeply touched by your wonderfully kind and thoughtful good wishes for my health and, in return, can only continue to serve you, to the best of my ability, throughout the Commonwealth,” King Charles said in the video.

<p>HENRY NICHOLLS/POOL/AFP via Getty</p> Prince William arrives for the Commonwealth Day service ceremony at Westminster Abbey on March 11, 2024

HENRY NICHOLLS/POOL/AFP via Getty

Prince William arrives for the Commonwealth Day service ceremony at Westminster Abbey on March 11, 2024

Related: Kate Middleton Seen Leaving Windsor with Prince William for Private Appointment After Issuing Photo Apology

The accidental mix-up came hours after Kate Middleton issued an apology for the controversy over the editing of an official family photo. The image, which was released on Sunday to mark Mother's Day in the U.K., was the first official photograph of the Princess of Wales since her abdominal surgery on Jan. 16.

However, the photo led to the palace facing questions after established photo agencies, including the AP and Reuters, withdrew the photo citing concerns over manipulation.

Can't get enough of PEOPLE's Royals coverage? Sign up for our free Royals newsletter to get the latest updates on Kate Middleton, Meghan Markle and more!

<p>Jacob King/PA Images via Getty Images</p> Kate Middleton celebrates the Windrush generation on Oct. 3, 2023

Jacob King/PA Images via Getty Images

Kate Middleton celebrates the Windrush generation on Oct. 3, 2023

On Monday morning, Princess Kate, 42, said she was sorry for "any confusion" about the picture. In a statement shared on the Prince and Princess of Wales' social media pages, she wrote, "Like many amateur photographers, I do occasionally experiment with editing. I wanted to express my apologies for any confusion the family photograph we shared yesterday caused. I hope everyone celebrating had a very happy Mother's Day." She signed the note with a "C" for Catherine, indicating the personal nature of the message.

Mark Borkowski, a London-based public relations and crisis communications expert, tells PEOPLE that in trying to release a new photo of the royal, the palace has made recent concerns over Princess Kate's health "worse."

"Now some people are asking if it is all generated by AI or is it a Photoshop of a photo taken. It’s not something you'd want the royal brand to be aligned with," he says.

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