Olympics 2021: 5 unmissable Day 6 events and when to watch

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Zac Stubblety-Cook is a genuine gold medal chance for Australia in the final of the 200m breaststroke. (Photo by Michael Kappeler/picture alliance via Getty Images)
Zac Stubblety-Cook is a genuine gold medal chance for Australia in the final of the 200m breaststroke. (Photo by Michael Kappeler/picture alliance via Getty Images)

Another huge morning for Australia at the Aquatics Centre with three big chances for gold, while there’s another shot for one of the highest-profile Australians at these Games.

Here are five events to watch on Day 6 at the Tokyo Olympics.

Men’s Golf, Day 1, from 8.30am AEST

For those looking for a little more low-octane sport to follow for the next few days, the men’s golf event kicks off this morning. 

Reintroduced to the Olympic program in Rio for the first time since 1904, golfers will tee off this morning at the picturesque Kasumigaseki Country Club.

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Marc Leishman (teeing off at 9.41am AEST) and Cameron Smith (11.14am) carry the Aussie hopes, but the hot favourites are Americans Collin Morikawa, Xander Schauffele and Justin Thomas, and Japan’s Hideki Matsuyama.

World No.3 Morikawa is fresh off his win at The Open less than two weeks ago, which made him a two-time major champion at the age of just 24, and he will be hard to beat over the next four days.

Men’s 200m breaststroke final, 11.44am AEST

You know all about Titmus and McKeown and Chalmers, but how much do you know about Zac Stubblety-Cook? Never heard of him? 

Well, you might well know the name after today. The 22-year-old from New South Wales dominated the Olympic trials, setting Commonwealth and national records with his blistering 2min 06.28sec 200m breaststroke swim.

That just happened to be the second fastest time ever, and is the fastest swim in the event this year. This might well be a gold not many in the general public were expecting.

Stubblety-Cook easily set the quickest time in yesterday’s semis and will go in this morning as favourite in the final at his first Olympics.

Men’s 100m freestyle final, 12.37pm AEST

Is it wrong to have popcorn for lunch? You’re going to need it for this one.

If women’s swimming has Titmus v Ledecky, then men’s swimming has Caeleb Dressel v Kyle Chalmers. 

Chalmers shocked the world when he won gold for Australia as an 18-year-old in Rio, but Dressel, who has taken the mantle from Michael Phelps as the top dog in Team USA, beat the Aussie for the world championship title in 2019.

Their match-up here is the most anticipated men’s race of the meet, made even bigger by Chalmers’s extraordinary final leg in the 4x100m relay that secured Australia a bronze medal on Monday. 

His time of 46.44sec would have sounded a major alarm to Dressel that he means business. To put it in context, the world record for the individual 100m freestyle is 46.91sec.

Dressel qualified second fastest in the semis yesterday behind Russian Kliment Kolesnikov, while Chalmers was sixth fastest, but it will be game on today.

Women’s 4x200m freestyle relay, 1.31pm AEST

Buckle up for Round 3 of Titmus v Ledecky. This is an event that has been owned by the US, having won five of the six gold medals since its introduction to the Olympics in 1996. 

The only time they’ve missed gold was when the Aussies grabbed it in Beijing, and we’re a huge chance to do it again here.

Put simply, the Aussie team bats deeper than the American sqaud. Titmus, Emma McKeon, Madison Wilson and Leah Neale have four of the seven best 200m freestyle times this year.

Titmus has had Ledecky covered in both their meetings so far, edging out the American in the 400m freestyle, while in yesterday’s 200m final Ledecky was always off the pace and finished in fifth as the Aussie etched her name into Australian Olympic history. Titmus can make it 3-0 here.

Women’s Canoe final, 4.55pm AEST

A couple of penalties in the K1 slalom on Tuesday turned gold into bronze for Australian Jess Fox, but she gets another chance here to add to her growing Olympic medal collection. 

The 27-year-old comes into the C1 event as the top ranked paddler.

Of the seven individual world titles she has won in her career, four have come in the C1, so this is another huge opportunity for a medal, and potentially that elusive gold. Tune in for the semi-finals from 3pm.

Watch 'Mind Games', the new series from Yahoo Sport Australia exploring the often brutal mental toil elite athletes go through in pursuit of greatness:

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