Nick Kyrgios' epic exchange with Wimbledon fan on match point

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·Sports Reporter
·4-min read
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Nick Kyrgios asks a fan where to place his serve while on match point in Wimbledon's second round.
Nick Kyrgios consulted a fan on match point before closing out a straight-sets victory over Italian entrant Gianluca Mager in Wimbledon's second round. Picture: Channel 9

Nick Kyrgios continued his strong Wimbledon form with assistance from a fan while on match point against second round opponent Gianluca Mager.

Looking to close out the 7-6 6-4 6-4 victory over the Italian, Kyrgios dashed over to a member of the crowd and consulted her as to where he should serve for the win.

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Mager's return went deep and Kyrgios had moved on to the third round, with the lively Australian's interactions with the crowd throughout the match highlighted by SEN reporter Brett Phillips.

“There was running commentary the whole way through, asking for tactical advice from the crowd," he said. 

"I tell you what, they had an almost 100 per cent strike rate! He fed off that.”

The fan's advice was evidently on the money - and she was thanked afterwards with a towel and match ball, as well as an apologetic Kyrgios saying he couldn't give her a hug. 

It was a victory which came with plenty of laughs and smiles - from both the player and his adoring fan club on Court No.3 - as well as an obscenity, for which Kyrgios was instantly forgiven as he apologised profusely.

Even his first set four-letter outburst after he'd blown a point, which saw him earn a code violation, was laughed off when he said sorry.

And when disputing - fairly good-naturedly - a foot fault awarded against him, he finished off his argument with the official by booming down another ace.

Everyone could see he was in the mood from the moment in the opening game when he delivered a hapless underarm serve.

It got better, of course, as he pounded down 29 aces and didn't give up a single break point in one hour 51 minutes.

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Mager was excellent but once he'd blown a 5-2 lead in the opening set tiebreak, Kyrgios was unstoppable, particularly with his running commentary as he chuntered away about how the court was as slow as the Roland Garros clay.

"Make it real grass!" he cried.

Nick Kyrgios powers through to Wimbledon third round

Once again, it was impossible not to marvel at how a man playing his first event since February who'd arrived four days before Wimbledon could produce such amazing shotmaking, like the impossible running drop shot played on the retreat miles behind the baseline.

Then there was the moment he chased down a drop shot with the cry that "I haven't stretched that much in six months!"

Early days, of course, but what makes him seem so dangerous this year is that he genuinely looks and sounds as if nothing can get under his skin while he's putting on his unique act.

Nick Kyrgios gives a fan who gave him some helpful advice his towel and a ball.
Nick Kyrgios hands a towel and ball to the fan who advised him where to put his serve on match point in his winning second round match at Wimbledon. (Photo by Mike Hewitt/Getty Images)

"I feel like when they come to my matches now, they know how I am,"he said.

"I'm quite lighthearted. Yeah, they know it's a bit of a show. They just want entertainment.

"I have people in the front row literally coaching me, like literally telling me, 'That's all right, good ball, great return, it will work next time, good depth'. I'm like, 'Dude, what is going on out here?'

"I just feel like I don't put as much pressure on myself anymore. When I was younger, it was hard to deal with all the criticism that everyone gave me. Like, it beat me down to a point of very bad depression.

"Like, I wasn't even coming to Wimbledon and enjoying myself. I was not embracing this amazing event.

"Now I just enjoy it when I'm out there. I breathe in the fresh air."

His next opponent will be Felix Auger-Aliassime, a four-set victor over Swede Mikael Ymer, but even the brilliant young Canadian can only ever be an extra in this show.

With AAP

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