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Australia’s most dangerous roads revealed

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA - NewsWire Photos SEPTEMBER 5, 2023: Police crash investigators on scene at a fatal crash on St Marys Rd in Berkshire Park on Tuesday morning At 7.15am. A man has died after his car collided with a mobile crane truck in SydneyÃs northwest, the truck driver has been taken to Nepean Hospital for mandatory testing. Picture: NCA NewsWire / Nikki Short
The research found nose-to-tail collisions were the most common form of car crash. Picture: NCA NewsWire / Nikki Short

Australia’s most dangerous road over the past year has been found — with Victoria’s hotspot taking out the dishonourable title for the sixth year in a row.

National insurer AAMI’s annual Crash Index has found Plenty Rd in Bundoora, a northern suburb of Melbourne, is once again the worst offender for bingles.

The research, covering the period of July 1, 2022 to June 30, 2023, also found male drivers were more likely to cause crashes than women, and that motorists aged 35 to 49 years were the most likely to offend on our roads.

Nose-to-tail collisions were the most common form of accident, typically occurring on Friday afternoons.

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA - NewsWire Photos SEPTEMBER 5, 2023: Police crash investigators on scene at a fatal crash on St Marys Rd in Berkshire Park on Tuesday morning At 7.15am. A man has died after his car collided with a mobile crane truck in SydneyÃs northwest, the truck driver has been taken to Nepean Hospital for mandatory testing. Picture: NCA NewsWire / Nikki Short
The research found nose-to-tail collisions were the most common form of car crash. Picture: NCA NewsWire / Nikki Short

Melbourne was joined by Brisbane, Perth and Sydney in retaining each city’s no. 1 collision hotspot, namely Gympie Rd in Chermside, Albany Hwy in Cannington and the Hume Hwy in Liverpool respectively.

In each location the most common type of crash was found to be nose-to-tail collisions.

Adelaide, Canberra, the NT and Hobart all ushered in new sites as their worst offenders, welcoming West Terrace in Adelaide, Monaro Hwy in Hume, Stuart Hwy in Katherine and Argyle St in Hobart to the top spot respectively.

AAMI head of motor customer engagement Tammy Hall said despite their geographical distance, each of the roads identified shared some of the same issues.

“These hotspots are generally major roads, intersecting with local streets through high traffic industrial, educational and shopping centre precincts, making them consistently busy throughout the day,” she said.

“Tailgating, driver distraction and potentially road rage can lead to nose to tail collisions, and to avoid them.

“Aussie drivers should travel at a safe distance behind the car in front and ensure they are paying attention at all times.”

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AAMI’s Crash Index for July 1, 2022 to June 30, 2023. Picture: AAMI

The national insurer said the data served as a reminder for Aussie drivers to remain vigilant and drive with care.

“Bumper to bumper collisions often happen during peak hour traffic when the roads are busy, patience is wearing thin, drivers are tired from the day, and are in a rush to get to their destination,” Ms Hall said.

“Most risks on the road can be mitigated if everyone pays attention and drives to the conditions.

“It’s up to all of us to do the right thing to ensure everyone’s safety on the road.”