Sporting world in mourning after death of legendary caller Vin Scully

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Vin Scully, pictured here addressing the crowd during a retirement ceremony in LA in 2016.
Vin Scully addresses the crowd during a retirement ceremony in LA in 2016. (Photo by Lisa Blumenfeld/Getty Images)

The sporting world is mourning the death of legendary baseball commentator Vin Scully.

The Los Angeles Dodgers announced on Tuesday night that the Hall of Fame broadcaster had died at age 94.

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The team said Scully died at his home in the Hidden Hills section of Los Angeles, surrounded by family.

“We have lost an icon,” team president and CEO Stan Kasten said in a statement.

“His voice will always be heard and etched in all of our minds forever.

“Vin Scully was one of the greatest voices in all of sports. He was a giant of a man, not only as a broadcaster, but as a humanitarian.

"He loved people. He loved life. He loved baseball and the Dodgers. And he loved his family. I know he was looking forward to joining the love of his life, Sandi.”

Scully spent 67 years as the voice of the Dodgers - both in Brooklyn and Los Angeles.

He will long be one of the sport’s most recognisable and respected voices.

Scully started working for the Dodgers in 1950, and remained there until he retired in 2016.

Vin Scully and wife Sandra, pictured here waving to the crowd during the National League Division Series at Dodger Stadium in 2016.
Vin Scully and wife Sandra wave to the crowd during the National League Division Series at Dodger Stadium in 2016. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)

He was the youngest broadcaster ever to call a World Series at age 25, and was behind the mic for countless iconic moments in baseball history.

He was the longest tenured broadcaster with a single team in professional sports history.

Scully began in the 1950s era of Pee Wee Reese and Jackie Robinson, on to the 1960s with Don Drysdale and Sandy Koufax, into the 1970s with Steve Garvey and Don Sutton, and through the 1980s with Orel Hershiser and Fernando Valenzuela.

In the 1990s it was Mike Piazza and Hideo Nomo, followed by Clayton Kershaw, Manny Ramirez and Yasiel Puig in the 21st century.

The Dodgers changed players, managers, executives, owners - and even coasts - but Scully and his iconic style remained a constant for fans.

Vin Scully, pictured here in Los Angeles in 2018.
Vin Scully in Los Angeles in 2018. (Photo by Greg Doherty/WireImage)

Baseball in mourning after death of Vin Scully

He opened broadcasts with the familiar greeting: “Hi, everybody, and a very pleasant good evening to you wherever you may be.”

Scully was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1982, received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame that same year, and also had the stadium’s press box named after him in 2001.

The street leading to Dodger Stadium’s main gate was also named in his honour in 2016.

That same year he received the Presidential Medal of Freedom from President Barack Obama.

“God has been so good to me to allow me to do what I’m doing,” Scully said before retiring.

“A childhood dream that came to pass and then giving me 67 years to enjoy every minute of it. That’s a pretty large thanksgiving day for me.”

Tributes have been flooding in around the sporting world for the iconic Scully.

with Associated Press and Yahoo Sports

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