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Longtime ESPN, baseball and Olympics writer Jim Caple dies at 61

Jim Caple worked at ESPN for close to two decades and spent time at The Athletic, the St. Paul Pioneer-Press and the Seattle Post-Intelligencer during his career. (Robin Alam/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)
Jim Caple worked at ESPN for close to two decades and spent time at The Athletic, the St. Paul Pioneer-Press and the Seattle Post-Intelligencer during his career. (Robin Alam/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)

Longtime ESPN and Major League Baseball writer Jim Caple died Sunday. He was 61.

Caple’s wife, Vicki, announced that he had been battling both ALS and dementia.

“My person, best friend and husband died on Sunday afternoon,” Vicki wrote on his Facebook account, via ESPN. “We all love Jim Caple so much, and he loved you. Many great times, laughs and adventures with all of us with Jim. Go in peace my love.”

Caple, a Washington native who attended the University of Washington, covered baseball at ESPN from 2001 to 2017. He also spent time at the St. Paul Pioneer-Press, the Seattle Post-Intelligencer and, most recently, The Athletic. In total, Caple covered 20 World Series and six Olympics. He was also a longtime columnist at ESPN’s “Page 2.”

He wrote several books throughout his career, including a New York Yankees book titled “The Devil Wears Pinstripes” and “Best Boston Sports Arguments” with longtime Boston Herald columnist Steve Buckley. He also wrote a novel that was partly based on his dad’s experience as a pilot in World War II.

"Jim was an amazing and prolific writer who always found the joy in sports," former ESPN vice president and Caple’s longtime editor Kevin Jackson said, via ESPN. "Whether he was writing about baseball, the Olympics, the NCAA Tournament or his beloved Tour de France, Jim cared deeply about the games we play, but he never took them too seriously."

Plenty of other writers, journalists and media members took to social media Monday to honor Caple.