Kyrgios in French Open fitness battle

Darren Walton

Nick Kyrgios will consult Australian Davis Cup captain Lleyton Hewitt on Tuesday as he nurses a worrying elbow injury that threatens to cruel his grand slam season.

Kyrgios is in a desperate fight to be fully fit for next month's French Open after requiring a cortisone shot to treat the problem that has restricted the Australian No.1 to just two events since early February.

The 22-year-old is back home in Canberra working around the clock to regain full health.

"After returning home and consulting with medical staff in Australia I have been diagnosed with Posterior Impingement and Ulnar Nerve Irritation and I have been advised to stop playing through it," Kyrgios posted on Instagram.

"After thorough investigations and careful consideration I have had a corticosteroid injection to settle the pain and inflammation.

"Now to maximise my recovery I have to build the strength needed to compete at my best over the next month, ensuring I have confidence in my elbow before returning."

Tennis Australia's director of performance, Wally Masur, on Sunday revealed Kyrgios would sound out Hewitt, one of his most trusted allies, and Davis Cup coach Jason Stoltenberg about "the next steps and where he sits".

Masur believes Kyrgios is also now playing a delicate balancing act trying to be in peak condition for Wimbledon, the grass-court major at which the former quarter-finalist is most likely to break through at grand-slam level.

"No matter what player, if they're going to play their best tennis, it's with a volume of matches under their belt," Masur told AAP.

"Because then the big points don't matter as much - they can play at a more subconcious level. The game seems to get easier when you're confident.

"So the match is the top of the pyramid. It's all the training underneath.

"So to serve at Nick's pace for best-of-five-sets, the prior month you've got to hit a lot of serves, otherwise you're shoulder will fall off as well as your elbow."

Despite facing the prospect of a disrupted - and limited - build-up, Masur is refusing to write off Kyrgios as a Wimbledon contender.

"There's probably not many (players) on tour that can do it like him," he said.

"Even in Miami (last month), he had barely played and he rocks into Miami and, bang', he's smoking guys and he's not far off the pace."