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Joe Wicks defends his decision to take daughter Indie, 5, out of school

Joe Wicks and his wife Rosie have taken their five-year-old daughter Indie out of school   (JOE WICKS/INSTAGRAM)
Joe Wicks and his wife Rosie have taken their five-year-old daughter Indie out of school (JOE WICKS/INSTAGRAM)

Social media fitness coach Joe Wicks has addressed his decision to pull his five-year-old daughter out of school and educate her at home.

Wicks, who became known as “the nation’s PE teacher” during the Covid lockdown due to the success of his online physical sessions for children,  revealed in July that his eldest child Indie was to be homeschooled.

He said the decision by him and his former model wife Rosie was so the family could “spend more time” together.

As well as Indie, the couple also share son Marley, three, and daughter Leni, who is about to turn one.

Some of Wicks’s 4.6 million Instagram followers suggested the move was “wrong” and “selfish”.

Now in an interview with The Times, the star has defended his decision – and indicated the move may not be permanent.

“It’s not like I’m saying, I’m going to homeschool my kids and go and live on a farm in the middle of nowhere,” he said. “It’s really just about our lifestyle [now].”

In regards to whether Indie would remain homeschooled, the 37-year-old fitness guru said he wants to have “another year” with his family and make the most of their time together.

“I don’t want to be someone who isn’t present in my children’s life,” he added. “What I try and give my children is stability and love, and I want them to know I’m always there for them.”

Earlier this year, Wicks said on his Instagram page that Indie had enjoyed her reception year, but that he and Rosie “have always loved teaching the kids at home and want the freedom to travel more and explore the world”.

“[Indie] might go to school next year. We have no idea long term but want to do at least a year of home educating,” Wicks added back in July.

Most children in the UK start full-time education in the September after they turn 4. They turn five in at some point in their first year.

In other countries – such as Australia – children start full time education a year later, or when they are six.

In the Spring term of this year, Department for Education figures suggest that 86,200 children in the UK are taught at home.