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Jennifer Aniston is 'so over cancel culture': 'Is there no redemption?'

Jennifer Aniston is 'so over cancel culture': 'Is there no redemption?'

Jennifer Aniston would like to cancel cancel culture.

"I'm so over cancel culture," she told Wall Street Journal in a new cover story published Tuesday. "I probably just got canceled by saying that. I just don't understand what it means... Is there no redemption? I don't know. I don't put everybody in the Harvey Weinstein basket."

Aniston said she was not personally harassed by the disgraced film producer and convicted sex offender, but she would not categorize her experiences with him as pleasant. "He's not a guy, you're like, 'God, I can't wait to hang out with Harvey.' Never," she said. "You were actually like, 'Oh, God, OK, suck it up.' I remember actually, he came to visit me on a movie to pitch me a movie. And I do remember consciously having a person stay in my trailer."

In response, Weinstein told WSJ Aniston "never had any uncomfortable instances with me."

Jennifer Aniston attends the Los Angeles Premiere of Netflix's "Murder Mystery 2" at Regency Village Theatre on March 28, 2023 in Los Angeles, California.
Jennifer Aniston attends the Los Angeles Premiere of Netflix's "Murder Mystery 2" at Regency Village Theatre on March 28, 2023 in Los Angeles, California.

Axelle/Bauer-Griffin/FilmMagic Jennifer Aniston

Weinstein was sentenced to 39 years in prison earlier this year following rape and sexual assault convictions in both New York and Los Angeles. The allegations against him revitalized activist Tarana Burke's #MeToo movement in 2017, with over 80 women having since accused Weinstein of misconduct and assault, including stars Ashley Judd and Gwyneth Paltrow. Such behavior in the workplace serves as the basis of Aniston's acclaimed Apple TV+ series The Morning Show, which follows a newsroom rattled by sexual misconduct allegations against one of its anchors.

Aniston has lamented the shifting culture before, stating that the evolution of comedy has made the art "tricky" in conversation with French outlet AFP earlier this year. Her hit '90s sitcom Friends, which has been reassessed by some modern-day critics as racist, homophobic, and sizeist, would not thrive in this particular landscape, she said. "There's a whole generation of people, kids, who are now going back to episodes of Friends and find them offensive," Aniston said. "There were things that were never intentional and others. We should have thought it through, but I don't think there was a sensitivity like there is now."

She added, "We can't take ourselves too seriously. Especially in the United States. Everyone is far too divided."

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