NSW eye unlikely Shield win over Tasmania

Glenn Cullen
·2-min read

NSW have orchestrated one of the more stunning turnarounds in recent Sheffield Shield history to be headed towards an unlikely win against Tasmania.

Embarrassed after being bowled out for just 64 in their first innings, the Blues savaged the Tigers attack when they batted again, declaring on 6-522 late on Tuesday.

In response, Tasmania were already in deep trouble, losing both openers to be 2-26 at stumps with a further 322 runs required for victory.

The signs were there early for NSW with Moises Henriques (113) and Nick Larkin (161) already in good form on Monday, the pair going on to register a 253-run partnership.

Henriques' departure prompted a mini-collapse, the Tigers picking up 4-37 including the bizarre wicket of Larkin who was stumped by Tim Paine after ponderously having his heel out of the crease.

But thoughts of a rattling through the long NSW tail were soon put to bed as Sean Abbott (102 not out) scored his maiden first-class ton and fellow quick Mitchell Starc (86 no) almost joined him.

"If they had carried on and took a few more wickets there the game is probably pretty even going into the last day," Abbott said.

Starc was captured hurling his bat outside the team marquee, seemingly unhappy with captain Peter Nevill's decision to declare when he had a century in sight.

"I might have to give him a big hug later on and get him some dinner," Abbott said of his fellow fast bowler.

Abbott thrashed six sixes and four fours in his 116-ball stay, coming after taking 4-33 in Tasmania's first innings of 239.

Jackson Bird and Gabe Bell finished with two wickets each for the Tigers but it won't be a day their attack will remember fondly.

Abbott and Starc may have been a little gassed after their batting exploits so it was left to Trent Copeland to do the damage when Tasmania took to the crease.

Copeland (2-7) had Charlie Wakim (0) and Jordan Silk (16) both out with Test batsman Matthew Wade (7 no) and nightwatchman Peter Siddle (3 no) left to see out the day in fading light.