Griffin continues role for A-League clubs

Emma Kemp
AAP

Greg Griffin will continue to lead the A-League clubs' grapple for power with Football Federation Australia despite selling his share of Adelaide United.

Griffin's future as the face of the clubs' bold reform agenda fell into uncertainty when a European-based consortium bought the Reds for a reported $12 million.

The South Australia-based lawyer held a 20 per cent stake and was long-term club chairman, building a reputation as an uncompromising and combative operator.

He has also been at the forefront of Australian football's bitter civil war as chairman of the Australian Professional Football Clubs Association (APFCA), the umbrella body representing the 10 A-League clubs.

And despite no longer holding an official position with any club, the APFCA confirmed on Thursday it had decided Griffin would remain in that role until his elected term expires at the end of November this year.

It means he will also continue to represent the clubs at the FFA congress, the body responsible for electing the FFA board and which FIFA has demanded be expanded.

"I'm humbled by the support from my peers and am delighted to continue as APFCA chairman and FFA congress member until my term ends in November," Griffin said.

"As I said in an email to my fellow members, I look forward to working with the football family towards an independent and flourishing A-League, sooner rather than later."

Melbourne City vice-chairman and APFCA board member Simon Pearce said Griffin's "new independent status" would offer further credibility to the organisation's bid for governance reform.

"Our unanimous decision is borne out of the passion and commitment that Greg has bought to the role," Pearce said.

"Continued access to his knowledge and experience, despite the change in his club status, will be of great benefit to the entire game."

FFA has been contacted for comment.

The governing body is still waiting to hear from FIFA and the AFC after a visiting delegation met with stakeholders last month to inform a timeline, composition and mandate for a 'congress review working group' it hopes will resolve the long-standing impasse.