'Great result': David Warner's pointed dig at Stuart Broad call

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·Sports Reporter
·4-min read
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  • Stuart Broad
    English cricketer (born 1986)
  • David Warner
    David Warner
    Australian cricketer
David Warner has admitted he was happy not to have to face England's Stuart Broad after their one-sided encounter in the previous Ashes series in England in 2019. Pictures: Getty Images
David Warner has admitted he was happy not to have to face England's Stuart Broad after their one-sided encounter in the previous Ashes series in England in 2019. Pictures: Getty Images

After the notoriously one-sided contest between Stuart Broad and David Warner during the 2019 Ashes, it should come as no surprise that the Australian opener was happy to note Broad's absence in the Boxing Day Test.

After being well and truly figured out by Broad on swinging English pitches two years ago, fans were keen to see how the rematch between the pair would go on Australian soil.

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That rematch has barely materialised, with Broad held out of both the Brisbane and Melbourne Tests as the home side romped to an Ashes series victory in record time.

Speaking after Australia secured series win, Warner admitted Broad had forced him into an overly defensive style very early in that series, and his absence in the Brisbane Test had allowed him to get settled early this time around.

Both Broad and fellow veteran strike bowler Jimmy Anderson were controversially left out of the team for the first Test, with Warner making 94 in his first innings of the series.

“In 2019 it was in England so he was able to get the ball to come back into us and go away from us,” Warner said.

“For me it was one of those tours where I didn’t really back my game plan and I sort of went too defensive and I didn’t attack.

“From my perspective that was my fault and obviously he bowled really well.

“Out here I’m not too sure. They have obviously picked Ollie Robinson for a reason. He is averaging 21 with the ball and he has had some successful Tests in England.

“I think they are obviously going with people they feel are going to be better away from home looking further down the track." 

Warner said England had played the veteran pair together 'too often' in the past, and suggested his belief that England's officials were hoping to see which of the nation's young bowlers would perform best abroad.

Nevertheless, Warner was happy to see Broad on the sidelines.

“I can’t worry about what they are doing, but from our perspective I think it is a great result that he is not playing," he said.

Soul-searching begins for English cricket

England coach Chris Silverwood admits hard questions must be asked after his dreams of leading an Ashes-winning tour were promptly crushed by Australia.

When Silverwood replaced Trevor Bayliss as head coach two-and-a-half years ago, he placed regaining the urn Down Under at the top of his wish list.

But after just 12 days of on-field action, there is nothing left to play for but damage limitation in the last two Ashes Tests following a humiliating MCG defeat on Tuesday.

Silverwood and captain Joe Root are sure to come under plenty of scrutiny with England going backwards as a Test team over the past couple of years.

They have lost nine and won just one of their last 12 Tests.

But there are no blindingly obvious coaching or captaincy candidates.

After a swift Ashes loss in Australia, Joe Root and the England Test team clearly have plenty of work to do. (Photo by HAMISH BLAIR/AFP via Getty Images)
After a swift Ashes loss in Australia, Joe Root and the England Test team clearly have plenty of work to do. (Photo by HAMISH BLAIR/AFP via Getty Images)

And it seems change at the top would not turn Haseeb Hameed, Rory Burns or Zak Crawley into battle-hardened opening batters or cure a chronic lack of fit quicks to back up Mark Wood.

"I think at the end of this tour there will certainly be reflections on a lot of things, on producing players who can come through and compete at this level and win back the Ashes for us," Silverwood said.

"That will mean working hard with the group of players we have here but also looking at other things as well.

"I don't think right now is the time to go into that but certainly, there will be questions asked later on."

It seems change at some level is inevitable.

England and Wales Cricket Board chief executive Tom Harrison and director of men's cricket Ashley Giles are two other names who may find themselves under the microscope.

Pleading his own case for more time, Silverwood said: "I do feel like I am capable of leading this team to winning things and that's what I'm going to stay focused on.

"That's all I can do, I'm not going to worry about my job.

"I don't want to be going back having lost 5-0. I want to win games over here."

With AAP

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