Gabba India Test the goal of cheeky Paine

Murray Wenzel
Australia is eyeing off a day-night Test against India next summer at the Gabba

A Test between Indian and Australia at the Gabba to open their series next summer?

Sounds good to Tim Paine, although the cheeky Australian captain says he'll have to run it by Virat Kohli first.

Australia racked up an innings win over Pakistan on Sunday afternoon to extend their undefeated run at the Brisbane stronghold to 31 matches in as many years.

India will play four Tests in Australia next summer and are a strong chance of opening their summer with a pink ball Test at the Gabba.

Paine was quick to respond when asked if he'd like to play world No.1 Test side India in Brisbane given they successfully avoided a clash at the imposing venue last year in a four-Test series they won 2-1.

"Well we'll certainly try (to play it in Brisbane), but we'll have to run that by Virat," he said.

"I'm sure we'll get an answer from him at some stage."

"See if we can get his permission to play here, maybe even get a pink ball Test if he's in a good mood."

The Indian captain just might be after notching a century in India's maiden day-night Test at Eden Gardens this week against Bangladesh.

They are on the cusp of victory early on day three.

A reluctant participant in the concept in the past, new BCCI president Sourav Ganguly has shown India's hand - at least on home soil - by green lighting this week's well-attended fixture in Kolkata.

A Gabba clash between the two powerhouses, especially under lights, is a mouth-watering proposition that would pit Australia's elite pace bowling cartel against Kohli and Indian quick Jasprit Bumrah against Steve Smith.

The Gabba faces stiff opposition for an India Test given the improvements of the Adelaide Oval, Perth's new Optus Stadium and the traditional Tests in Sydney and Melbourne. There will be a one-off Test against Afghanistan.

But Paine is staunchly in Brisbane's corner given Australia's incredible record at the venue.

"Australian teams have bowled and batted well here for a long time," he said.

"Having said that, it doesn't win us games of cricket. The reason we win games of cricket at the Gabba is because we outplay our opposition."

There were plenty of empty seats across the four days at the Gabba, but the 45,991 that attended was still the highest figure for a day Test against Pakistan.

A day-night Test between India and Australia at the Gabba would be well attended, given 78,095 people watched Pakistan almost pull off an unlikely win under lights against Australia at the ground three years ago.